Permission (philosophy)

Permission (philosophy)

Permission, in philosophy, is the attribute of a person whose performance of a specific action, otherwise ethically wrong, would thereby involve no ethical fault. Consent is a legal embodiment of the concept.

Permissions depend on norms or institutions.

Many permissions and obligations are complementary to each other, and deontic logic is a tool sometimes used in reasoning about such relationships.

Further reading

  • Alexy, Robert, Theorie der Grundrechte, Suhrkamp, Frankfurt a. M.: 1985. Translation: A theory of constitutional rights, Oxford University Press, Oxford: 2002.
  • Raz, Joseph, Practical reason and norms, Oxford University, Oxford: 1975.
  • von Wright, G. H., Norm and action. A logical enquiry, Routledge & Kegan Paul, London: 1963.

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