Penobscot Bay

Penobscot Bay

Penobscot Bay, inlet of the Atlantic Ocean, 35 mi (56 km) long and 27 mi (43 km) wide, S Maine. The bay was entered by the English explorer Martin Pring in 1603; the French explorer Samuel de Champlain claimed the area for France in 1604. An important shipbuilding center in the 19th cent., the bay has become a fishing and resort center.
Penobscot Bay originates from the mouth of Maine's Penobscot River. There are many islands in this bay, and on them, some of the country's most well-known summer colonies. The bay served as portal for the one time "lumber capital of the world," namely; the city of Bangor. Named after the major river that feeds it, this bay area forms part of the traditional homeland of the Wabanaki Indians, in particular the Penobscot tribe (also named after this river). For thousands of years, they hunted, fished, and gathered clams and other food in this bay area. Ancient remains of their campsites have been found on the bay's shores and islands.

Islands in Penobscot Bay

Towns along the western side

Towns on the eastern side

References

External links

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