Passy

Passy

[pa-see]
Passy, Frédéric, 1822-1912, French economist, winner (1901, with J. H. Dunant) of the first Nobel Peace Prize. He studied law but abandoned it for journalism and the study of economics and problems of peace. In 1867 he founded the International League for Permanent Peace, later known as the French Society of the Friends of Peace; he served as its general secretary until 1889, when, in association with Sir William R. Cremer, he founded the Inter-Parliamentary Union of Arbitration. He was a member of the chamber of deputies from 1874 to 1889. His best-known work is Historique du mouvement de la paix (1904). The phonetician Paul Edouard Passy (1859-1940) was his son.
Auteuil and Passy are part of the 16th arrondissement of Paris. They are located near the suburb Neuilly-sur-Seine.

This area is commonly known as one of the richest in Paris, with calm, select and very expensive neighbourhoods, including many mansions. Auteuil-Neuilly-Passy is sometimes abbreviated as NAP.

The borough of Auteiul, once home to Victor Hugo and Molière and the birthplace of Marcel Proust, was incorporated into the city of Paris in 1859-60 by the Law of 16 June 1859. A hamlet built between the thirteenth and seventeenth centuries, it became a fashionable country retreat for French elites during the reign of Louis XV.

The satiric group Les Inconnus made in 1991 a song called "Auteuil, Neuilly, Passy (rap BCBG)".

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