Pacific

Pacific

[puh-sif-ik]
Pacific, War of the, 1879-84, war between Chile and the allied nations, Peru and Bolivia; also called the Chile-Peruvian War. The trouble began when President Hilarión Daza of Bolivia rescinded (Feb., 1879) the contract that had given a Chilean company the right to exploit nitrate deposits in Atacama, a province of Bolivia. In reprisal Chile took the port of Antofagasta, and two weeks later war was formally acknowledged. Peru, bound since 1873 by a defensive alliance to Bolivia, refused to promise to remain neutral, and Chile declared war on Peru. At the end of 1879, Chile had not only won Atacama and the Peruvian province of Tarapacá, but by the capture of Huáscar, a Peruvian ironclad warship, had gained control of the sea. Although the presidents of Peru and Bolivia, Mariano Ignacio Prado and Hilarión Daza, respectively, were replaced by other leaders, no change occurred in the war; by coordinated sea and land attacks the Chilean conquest continued. During 1880, Chilean forces took Tacna and Arica and, after an invasion by sea and the victories of Chorillos and Miraflores (Jan., 1881), made a triumphal entry into Lima. Although the Peruvian leader Andrés Avelino Cáceres, aided by Miguel Iglesias, gallantly fought a guerrilla campaign, Peru and Bolivia were thoroughly vanquished. The Treaty of Ancón (Oct., 1883) restored peace between Peru and Chile; a truce at Valparaíso (Apr., 1884) was signed between Bolivia and Chile, but a definitive treaty was not agreed upon until 1904. Chile acquired Atacama, Bolivia's only coastal territory, now called Antofagasta. Peru also had to cede Tarapacá to Chile and surrendered control of the provinces of Tacna and Arica, their disposition to be decided by plebiscite after 10 years. This provision led to the Tacna-Arica Controversy.

(1879–83) Conflict involving Chile, Bolivia, and Peru over disputed territory on the mineral-rich Pacific coast. National boundaries in the region were not definitively established prior to the conflict, and in the 1870s Chile controlled nitrate fields claimed by Peru and Bolivia. When demand for nitrates rose, war broke out over the territory. Chile defeated both countries and took control of valuable mining areas in each; Bolivia lost its entire Pacific coast. A 1904 treaty gave Bolivian commerce freedom of transit through Chilean territory, but Bolivia continued to try to escape its landlocked status (see Chaco War). Peru foundered economically for decades after the war. A final accord between Peru and Chile was only reached in 1929 through U.S. mediation.

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(1879–83) Conflict involving Chile, Bolivia, and Peru over disputed territory on the mineral-rich Pacific coast. National boundaries in the region were not definitively established prior to the conflict, and in the 1870s Chile controlled nitrate fields claimed by Peru and Bolivia. When demand for nitrates rose, war broke out over the territory. Chile defeated both countries and took control of valuable mining areas in each; Bolivia lost its entire Pacific coast. A 1904 treaty gave Bolivian commerce freedom of transit through Chilean territory, but Bolivia continued to try to escape its landlocked status (see Chaco War). Peru foundered economically for decades after the war. A final accord between Peru and Chile was only reached in 1929 through U.S. mediation.

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Body of salt water extending from the Antarctic region in the south to the Arctic circle in the north and lying between the continents of Asia and Australia on the west and North and South America on the east. It occupies about one-third of the surface of the earth and is by far the largest of the world's oceans. Its area, excluding adjacent seas, is approximately 63,800,000 sq mi (165,250,000 sq km), twice that of the Atlantic Ocean and more than the whole land area of the globe. Its mean depth is 14,040 ft (4,280 m). The western Pacific is noted for its many peripheral seas.

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in full Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation

Trade group established in 1989 in response to the growing interdependence of Asia-Pacific economies and the advent of regional economic blocs (such as the European Union and the North American Free Trade Area) in other parts of the world. APEC works to raise living standards and education levels through sustainable economic growth and to foster a sense of community and an appreciation of shared interests among Asia-Pacific countries. At the end of the 1990s APEC's membership included its 12 founding members—Australia, Brunei, Canada, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and the United States—as well as Chile, China (including Hong Kong), Mexico, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Russia, and Vietnam; Taiwan also participates as “Chinese Taipei.” The Pacific Economic Cooperation Council, the South Pacific Forum, and the secretariat of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations maintain observer status. The APEC group represents about 40percnt of the world's population, 40percnt of global trade, and 50percnt of the world's gross national product. Seealso NAFTA; trade agreement; World Trade Organization.

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The Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10) is a college athletic conference which operates in the western United States. It participates in the NCAA's Division I; its football teams compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS; formerly Division I-A), the higher of two levels of NCAA Division I football competition. The conference's ten members (which are primarily flagship research universities in their respective regions, well-regarded academically, and with relatively large student enrollment) compete in 22 NCAA sports. It was founded as the Athletic Association of Western Universities or AAWU in 1959, and went by the names Big Five, Big Six, and Pacific 8 before becoming the Pacific 10 in 1978. The current commissioner of the conference is Thomas C. Hansen, who has announced that he will retire in July 2009 after 26 years in that position.

Membership

Full members

Institution Location Founded Affiliation Enrollment Nickname NCAA Championships
University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona
(518,956)
1885 Public (Arizona Board of Regents) 37,036 Wildcats 19
Arizona State University Tempe, Arizona
(169,712)
1885 Public (Arizona Board of Regents) 64,394 Sun Devils 20
University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, California
(102,743)
1868 Public (University of California system) 33,000 Golden Bears 26
University of Oregon Eugene, Oregon
(153,690)
1876 Public (Oregon University System) 20,339 Ducks 14
Oregon State University Corvallis, Oregon
(53,900)
1868 Public (Oregon University System) 19,276 Beavers 3
Stanford University Palo Alto, California
(61,200)
1891 Private/Non-sectarian 14,654 Cardinal 94
University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, California
(3,849,378)
1919 Public (University of California system) 38,000 Bruins 103
University of Southern California Los Angeles, California
(3,849,378)
1880 Private/Non-sectarian 32,160 Trojans 84
University of Washington Seattle, Washington
(582,174)
1861 Public 42,708 Huskies 4
Washington State University Pullman, Washington
(27,150)
1890 Public 23,121 Cougars 2

Endowment

  1. Stanford University-$17.2 billion
  2. University of Southern California-$3.7 billion
  3. University of California, Berkeley-$2.8 billion
  4. University of Washington-$2.5 billion
  5. University of California, Los Angeles-$2.2 billion
  6. Washington State University-$650 million
  7. University of Oregon-$566 million
  8. Arizona State University-$501 million
  9. University of Arizona-$466 million
  10. Oregon State University-$440 million

Associate members (men's soccer)

Associate members (wrestling)

History

Pacific Coast Conference

The roots of the Pac-10 Conference go back to December 15, 1915, when the Pacific Coast Conference (PCC) was founded at a meeting at the Oregon Hotel in Portland, Oregon. Charter members were the University of California (now University of California, Berkeley), the University of Washington, the University of Oregon, and Oregon State College (now Oregon State University). The conference began play in 1916.

One year later, Washington State College (now Washington State University) joined the league, followed by Stanford University in 1918.

In 1922, the PCC expanded to eight teams with the admission of USC and Idaho. Montana joined the Conference in 1924, and in 1928, the PCC grew to 10 members with the addition of UCLA.

For many years, the conference split into two divisions for basketball -- a Southern Division comprising the four California schools and a Northern Division comprising the six schools in the Pacific Northwest.

In 1950, Montana departed to join the Mountain States Conference. The PCC continued as a nine-team league through 1958.

AAWU (Big Five and Big Six)

Following a "pay-for-play" scandal at several PCC institutions (specifically Cal, USC, UCLA and Washington), the PCC disbanded in 1959. When Cal, Stanford, UCLA, USC, and Washington started talking about forming a new conference, retired Admiral Thomas J. Hamilton interceded and suggested the schools consider creating a "power conference." Nicknamed the "Airplane Conference", the five PCC schools would've played with other big schools including Army, Navy, Air Force, Notre Dame, Penn, Penn State, Duke, and Georgia Tech among others. The effort fell through when a member of the Pentagon vetoed the idea and the service academies backed out.

On July 1, 1959 the Athletic Association of Western Universities was formed, with Cal, Stanford, UCLA, USC, and Washington as charter members. The conference also was popularly known as the Big Five from 1960-1962 Washington State University joined in 1962. The conference was then known as the Big Six.

Pacific-8

The University of Oregon and Oregon State University joined in 1964. Idaho was not invited to join the AAWU and played as an independent until the formation of the Big Sky Conference in 1963.

In 1968, the AAWU renamed itself the Pacific-8 Conference, or Pac-8 for short.

Pacific-10

In 1978, the conference added WAC powers Arizona and Arizona State, creating the Pacific-10 conference or Pac-10 in its current form.

The Pac-10 claims the PCC's history as its own. It inherited the PCC's berth in the Rose Bowl, and the eight largest schools in the old PCC all eventually joined the new league. However, the older league had a separate charter.

The Pac-10 is one of the founding members of the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation, a conference organized to provide competition in non-revenue Olympic sports. All Pac-10 members participate in at least one MPSF sport, and for certain sports, the Pac-10 admits certain schools as Associate Members (which currently are San Diego State for men's soccer, and UC Davis, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, Boise State, Cal State Fullerton, Portland State, and Cal State Bakersfield for wrestling).

The conference expressed interest in admitting Texas after the collapse of the Southwest Conference. Texas expressed an interest in joining a strong academic conference, but joined three fellow SWC schools in forming the Big 12 Conference in 1996.

Of Division I conferences, only the Ivy League has maintained its current membership for a longer time than the Pac-10.

Pac-10 football rivalries

The Pac-10 is an anomaly in college sports, in that each school within the conference has its own in-state, conference rivalry. One is an intracity rivalry (UCLA-USC), and another is within the same metropolitan area (Cal-Stanford). These rivalries (and the name given to the football forms) are:

There are other notable football rivalries within the Pac-10 conference.

All of the California schools consider each other major rivals, due to the culture clash between Northern and Southern California. USC and Stanford have long-standing football grudge as the only two private institutions in the conference . Cal and UCLA have a rivalry rooted in their shared history as the top programs within the University of California system. Cal and USC also have a long history, having played each other every year in football since 1916.

Oregon and Washington also have an unofficial rivalry (despite recent efforts to give it the name "The Cascade Clash"). All of the Northwest schools consider each other as rivals due to the proximity and long history.

The University of Arizona and the University of New Mexico have a recently renewed rivalry game, based upon when they were both members of the Western Athletic Conference and both states were territories before being admitted as states. They played for the Kit Carson Rifle trophy, which was no longer used starting with their meeting in the 1997 Insight Bowl.

USC and Notre Dame have an intersectional rivalry (See Notre Dame-USC rivalry). The games in Indiana are played in mid-October, while the games in Los Angeles are usually played in late November.

With the NCAA permanently approving 12-game schedules in college football in 2006, the Pac-10 — alone among major conferences in doing so — went to a nine-game conference schedule in which member schools now play each conference opponent every year. Previously, the schools did not play one non-rival opponent, resulting in an eight-game conference schedule (4 home games and 4 away).

Rivalries in other sports

All of the intra-conference rivalries in football are carried over into other sports. However, over the years UCLA and Arizona have developed a primarily basketball rivalry between the two schools because both teams have historically dominated the conference. In the last few years, Stanford's success has also led to a rivalry with Arizona, which peaked in 2000 with both receiving #1 seeds in the NCAA tournament. In addition, certain nonconference rivalries have developed in other sports.

During the 1970s, UCLA and Notre Dame had an intense men's basketball rivalry. For several years, it was the only nonconference game in Division I basketball that was played twice a season (home-and-home). Unquestionably, the most famous game in the rivalry was on January 19, 1974, when Notre Dame scored the last 12 points of the game to nip UCLA and end the Bruins' record 88-game winning streak. This rivalry is now dormant, partly because Notre Dame is no longer independent in sports other than football.

In Baseball, there are intense rivalries between the four southern schools. Arizona, Arizona State, USC and UCLA have long and successful histories in baseball and all have won national titles in the sport. The most intense series is widely regarded to be the "Basebrawl" series between #97 USC and #95 Arizona State in 1990. Arizona State swept the series and in the final game a bench clearing brawl spread quickly to the stands and made national headlines. Several were injured and riot police were called to end the fracas.

Washington and California have a longstanding rivalry in men's crew as the two traditionally dominant programs on the West Coast.

The campuses of Washington State University and the University of Idaho are eight miles apart, creating a natural border war. Recently, the football rivalry has been dubbed Battle of the Palouse.

Due to the unique geographic nature of the Pac-10 teams, the teams travel in pairs for road basketball games. For example, on Thursday, February 28, 2008, USC played Arizona and UCLA played Arizona State. Two nights later the teams switched and USC played Arizona State and UCLA played Arizona. The teams are paired as followed: USC and UCLA (the L.A. teams), Arizona and Arizona State (the Arizona teams), Cal and Stanford (the Bay Area teams), Washington and Washington State (the Washington teams), and Oregon and Oregon State (the Oregon teams). Usually, the games are played on Thursdays and Saturdays with a game or occasionally two on Sundays for television purposes.

Conference facilities

School Football stadium Capacity Basketball arena Capacity Baseball stadium Capacity
Arizona Arizona Stadium 57,803 McKale Center 14,545 Kindall Field 6,500
Arizona State Sun Devil Stadium at Frank Kush Field 71,706 Wells Fargo Arena 14,198 Packard Stadium over 4,000
California California Memorial Stadium 71,799 Haas Pavilion 11,877 Evans Diamond 2,500
Oregon Autzen Stadium at Rich Brooks Field 54,000 McArthur Court 9,087 PK Park ** Resumes play in 2008-09 4,000-5,000 projected
Oregon State Reser Stadium 45,674 Gill Coliseum 10,400 Goss Stadium at Coleman Field 2,000
Stanford Stanford Stadium 50,000 Maples Pavilion 7,233 Sunken Diamond 4,000
UCLA Rose Bowl 91,936 Pauley Pavilion 12,819 Jackie Robinson Stadium 1,250
USC Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum 93,607 Galen Center 10,258 Dedeaux Field more than 1,800
Washington Husky Stadium 72,500 Bank of America Arena at Hec Edmundson Pavilion 10,000 Husky Ballpark 1,500
Washington State Martin Stadium 40,000 Beasley Coliseum 12,058 Bailey-Brayton Field 3,500

Past Conference Champions

Men's Basketball

The Pacific Coast Conference began playing basketball in the 1915-16 season. The PCC was split into North and South Divisions for basketball beginning with the 1922-23 season. The winners of the two divisions would play a best of three series of games to determine the PCC basketball champion. If two division teams tied, they would have a one game playoff to produce the division representative. Starting with the first NCAA Men's Basketball Championship in 1939, the winner of the PCC divisional playoff was given the automatic berth in the NCAA tournament. Oregon, the 1939 PCC champion, won the championship game in the 1939 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament.

The last divisional playoff was in the 1954-55 season. After that, there was no divisional play and all teams played each other in a round robin competition. From the 1955-56 season through the 1958-59 season, the regular season conference champion was awarded the NCAA tournament berth from the PCC. In the case of a tie, a tie breaker rule was used to determine the NCAA tournament representative.

Beginning with the 1975 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament, the Pac-10 would usually place at least one other at-large team in the tournament.

By the 1985-86 season, the Pac-10 was one of three remaining conferences that gave their automatic NCAA tournament bid to the regular season round-robin champion. The other two conferences were the Ivy League and the Big Ten Conference.

The modern Pacific-10 Conference Men's Basketball Tournament format began in 1987. It was dropped after 1990 upon opposition from coaches and poor revenue and attendance.

The tournament was restarted by a 8-2 vote of the athletic directors of the conference in 2000 after determining that a tournament would help increase exposure of the conference and help the seeding of the schools in the NCAA tournament.

Season Conference Champion (#) Tournament Champion (#)
1915-16 California (1)
Oregon State (1)
1916-17 Washington State (1)
1918-19 Oregon (1)
1919-20 Stanford (1)
1920-21 California (2)
Stanford (2)
1921-22 Idaho (1)
1922-23 Idaho (2)
1923-24 California (3)
1924-25 California (4)
1925-26 California (5)
1926-27 California (6)
1927-28 USC (1)
1928-29 California (7)
1929-30 USC (2)
1930-31 Washington (1)
1931-32 California (8)
1932-33 Oregon State (2)
1933-34 Washington (2)
1934-35 USC (3)
1935-36 Stanford (3)
1936-37 Stanford (4)
1937-38 Stanford (5)
1938-39 Oregon (2)
1939-40 USC (4)
1940-41 Washington State (2)
1941-42 Stanford (6)
1942-43 Washington (3)
1943-44 California (9)
Washington (4)
1944-45 Oregon (3)
UCLA (1)
1945-46 California (10)
1946-47 Oregon State (3)
1947-48 Washington (5)
1948-49 Oregon State (4)
1949-50 UCLA (2)
1950-51 Washington (6)
1951-52 UCLA (3)
1952-53 Washington (7)
1953-54 USC (5)
1954-55 Oregon State (5)
1955-56 UCLA (4)
1956-57 California (11)
1957-58 California (12)
Oregon State (6)
1958-59 California (13)
1959-60 California (14)
1960-61 USC (6)
1961-62 UCLA (5)
1962-63 Stanford (7)
UCLA (6)
1963-64 UCLA (7)
1964-65 UCLA (8)
1965-66 Oregon State (7)
1966-67 UCLA (9)
1967-68 UCLA (10)
1968-69 UCLA (11)
1969-70 UCLA (12)
1970-71 UCLA (13)
1971-72 UCLA (14)
1972-73 UCLA (15)
1973-74 UCLA (16)
1974-75 UCLA (17)
1975-76 UCLA (18)
1976-77 UCLA (19)
1977-78 UCLA (20)
1978-79 UCLA (21)
1979-80 Oregon State (8)
1980-81 Oregon State (9)
1981-82 Oregon State (10)
1982-83 UCLA (22)
1983-84 Oregon State (11)
Washington (8)
1984-85 USC (7)
Washington (9)
1985-86 Arizona (1)
1986-87 UCLA (23) UCLA (1)
1987-88 Arizona (2) Arizona (1)
1988-89 Arizona (3) Arizona (2)
1989-90 Arizona (4)
Oregon State (12)
Arizona (3)
1990-91 Arizona (5)
1991-92 UCLA (24)
1992-93 Arizona (6)
1993-94 Arizona (7)
1994-95 UCLA (25)
1995-96 UCLA (26)
1996-97 UCLA (27)
1997-98 Arizona (8)
1998-99 Stanford (8)
1999-00 Arizona (9)
Stanford (9)
2000-01 Stanford (10)
2001-02 Oregon (4) Arizona (4)
2002-03 Arizona (10) Oregon (1)
2003-04 Stanford (11) Stanford (1)
2004-05 Arizona (11) Washington (1)
2005-06 UCLA (28) UCLA (2)
2006-07 UCLA (29) Oregon (2)
2007-08 UCLA (30) UCLA (3)

See also

  • Bold Text denotes National Champion. (Arizona was National Champion in 1997, but not Conference Champion.)
  • Pac-10 Tournament

Women's Basketball

Conf Ovrl
Year Team W L Pct W L Pct
1986-87 USC 15 3 0.833 22 8 0.733
1987-88 Washington 16 2 0.889 25 5 0.833
1988-89 Stanford 18 0 1.000 28 3 0.903
1989-90 Stanford 17 1 0.944 32 1 0.970
Washington 17 1 0.944 28 3 0.903
1990-91 Stanford 16 2 0.889 26 6 0.813
1991-92 Stanford 15 3 0.833 30 3 0.909
1992-93 Stanford 15 3 0.833 26 6 0.812
1993-94 USC 16 2 0.887 26 4 0.867
1994-95 Stanford 17 1 0.944 30 3 0.909
1995-96 Stanford 18 0 1.000 29 3 0.906
1996-97 Stanford 18 0 1.000 34 2 0.944
1997-98 Stanford 17 1 0.944 21 6 0.778
1998-99 Oregon 15 3 0.833 25 6 0.806
UCLA 15 3 0.833 26 8 0.765
1999-00 Oregon 14 4 0.778 23 8 0.742
2000-01 Arizona State 12 6 0.667 20 11 0.645
Stanford 12 6 0.667 19 11 0.633
Washington 12 6 0.667 22 10 0.688
2001-02 Stanford 18 0 1.000 32 3 0.914
2002-03 Stanford 15 3 0.833 27 5 0.844
2003-04 Arizona 14 4 0.778 24 9 0.727
Stanford 14 4 0.778 27 7 0.813
2004-05 Stanford 17 1 0.944 32 3 0.914
2005-06 Stanford 15 3 0.833 26 8 0.765
2006-07 Stanford 17 1 0.944 28 4 0.875

Football

Conf Ovrl
Year Conference Champion (#) W L T Pts Opp W L T
1916 Washington (1) 3 0 1 62 10 6 0 1
1917 Washington State (1) 3 0 0 46 3 6 0 0
1918 California (1) 2 0 0 72 0 7 2 0
1919 *Oregon (1) 2 1 0 33 20 5 1 3
Washington (2) 2 1 0 33 31 5 1 0
1920 California (2) 3 0 0 104 7 9 0 0
1921 California (3) 4 0 0 167 10 9 0 1
1922 California (4) 4 0 0 146 7 9 0 0
1923 California (5) 5 0 0 66 7 9 0 1
1924 Stanford (1) 3 0 1 92 36 7 1 1
1925 Washington (3) 5 0 0 88 24 10 1 1
1926 Stanford (2) 4 0 0 112 40 10 0 1
1927 *Stanford (3) 4 0 1 78 32 8 2 1
USC (1) 4 0 1 99 38 8 1 1
1928 USC (2) 4 0 1 84 20 9 0 1
1929 USC (3) 6 1 0 258 29 10 2 0
1930 Washington State (2) 6 0 0 134 20 9 1 0
1931 USC (4) 7 0 0 259 13 10 1 0
1932 USC (5) 6 0 0 112 13 10 0 0
1933 Oregon (2) 4 1 0 45 29 9 1 0
*Stanford (4) 4 1 0 56 23 8 2 1
1934 Stanford (5) 5 0 0 93 7 9 1 1
1935 California (6) 4 1 0 55 22 9 1 0
*Stanford (6) 4 1 0 60 7 8 1 0
UCLA (1) 4 1 0 75 39 8 2 0
1936 Washington (4) 7 0 1 141 21 7 2 1
1937 California (7) 6 0 1 137 26 10 0 1
1938 California (8) 6 1 0 107 37 10 1 0
*USC (6) 6 1 0 131 36 9 2 0
1939 USC (7) 5 0 2 121 21 8 0 2
1940 Stanford (7) 7 0 0 141 66 10 0 0
1941 Oregon State (1) 7 2 0 123 33 8 2 0
1942 UCLA (2) 6 1 0 146 58 7 4 0
1943 USC (8) 5 0 0 95 13 8 2 0
1944 USC (9) 3 0 2 129 39 8 0 2
1945 USC (10) 5 1 0 107 43 7 4 0
1946 UCLA (3) 7 0 0 216 45 10 1 0
1947 USC (11) 6 0 0 147 20 7 2 1
1948 *California (9) 6 0 0 155 40 10 1 0
Oregon (3) 7 0 0 125 48 9 2 0
1949 California (10) 7 0 0 220 80 10 1 0
1950 California (11) 5 0 1 124 28 9 1 1
1951 Stanford (8) 6 1 0 152 101 9 2 0
1952 USC (12) 6 0 0 174 32 10 1 0
1953 UCLA (4) 6 1 0 172 41 8 2 0
1954 UCLA (5) 6 0 0 256 26 9 0 0
1955 UCLA (6) 6 0 0 197 37 9 2 0
1956 Oregon State (2) 6 1 1 152 104 7 3 1
1957 *Oregon (4) 6 2 0 124 81 7 4 0
Oregon State (3) 6 2 0 147 110 8 2 0
1958 California (12) 6 1 0 127 85 7 4 0
1959 UCLA (7) 3 1 0 91 51 5 4 1
USC (13) 3 1 0 69 60 8 2 0
*Washington (5) 3 1 0 68 29 10 1 0
1960 Washington (6) 4 0 0 100 25 10 1 0
1961 UCLA (8) 3 1 0 78 39 7 4 0
1962 USC (14) 4 0 0 99 23 11 0 0
1963 Washington (7) 4 1 0 96 58 6 5 0
1964 *Oregon State (4) 3 1 0 74 36 8 3 0
USC (15) 3 1 0 88 58 7 3 0
1965 UCLA (9) 4 0 0 134 56 8 2 1
1966 USC (16) 4 1 0 101 44 7 4 0
1967 USC (17) 6 1 0 182 47 10 1 0
1968 USC (18) 6 0 0 114 90 9 1 1
1969 USC (19) 6 0 0 129 66 10 0 1
1970 Stanford (9) 6 1 0 220 101 9 3 0
1971 Stanford (10) 6 1 0 162 98 9 3 0
1972 USC (20) 7 0 0 243 59 12 0 0
1973 USC (21) 7 0 0 240 124 9 2 1
1974 USC (22) 6 0 1 226 69 10 1 1
1975 California (13) 6 1 0 235 132 8 3 0
*UCLA (10) 6 1 0 215 123 9 2 1
1976 USC (23) 7 0 0 234 81 11 1 0
1977 Washington (8) 6 1 0 238 103 8 4 0
1978 USC (24) 6 1 0 182 81 12 1 0
1979 USC (25) 6 0 1 244 99 11 0 1
1980 Washington (9) 6 1 0 198 119 9 3 0
1981 Washington (10) 6 2 0 185 147 10 2 0
1982 UCLA (11) 5 1 1 218 148 10 1 1
1983 UCLA (12) 6 1 1 211 158 7 4 1
1984 USC (26) 7 1 0 148 107 9 3 0
1985 UCLA (13) 6 2 0 231 120 9 2 1
1986 Arizona State (1) 5 1 1 203 122 10 1 1
1987 UCLA (14) 7 1 0 309 123 10 2 0
*USC (27) 7 1 0 253 139 8 4 0
1988 USC (28) 8 0 0 289 121 10 2 0
1989 USC (29) 6 0 1 174 67 9 2 1
1990 Washington (11) 7 1 0 340 99 10 2 0
1991 Washington (12) 8 0 0 321 77 12 0 0
1992 Stanford (11) 6 2 0 184 130 10 3 0
*Washington (13) 6 2 0 219 117 9 3 0
1993 Arizona (1) 6 2 0 209 128 10 2 0
*UCLA (15) 6 2 0 217 168 8 4 0
USC (30) 6 2 0 229 141 8 5 0
1994 Oregon (5) 7 1 0 199 108 9 4 0
1995 *USC (31) 6 1 1 214 130 9 2 1
Washington (14) 6 1 1 232 170 7 4 1
1996 Arizona State (2) 8 0 0 346 182 11 1 0
1997 UCLA (16) 7 1 0 292 181 10 2 0
*Washington State (3) 7 1 0 297 246 10 2 0
1998 UCLA (17) 8 0 0 309 198 10 2 0
1999 Stanford (12) 7 1 0 313 197 8 4 0
2000 Oregon (6) 7 1 0 215 172 10 2 0
Oregon State (5) 7 1 0 275 161 11 1 0
*Washington (15) 7 1 0 258 183 11 1 0
2001 Oregon (7) 7 1 0 281 181 11 1 0
2002 USC (32) 7 1 0 299 163 11 1 0
*Washington State (4) 7 1 0 285 188 10 3 0
2003 USC (33) 7 1 0 342 161 12 1 0
2004 USC (34) 8 0 0 285 117 13 0 0
2005 USC (35) 8 0 0 383 149 12 1 0
2006 California (14) 7 2 0 280 173 10 3 0
*USC (36) 7 2 0 242 131 11 2 0
2007 Arizona State (3) 7 2 0 274 211 10 2 0
*USC (37) 7 2 0 250 150 10 2 0

* Denotes Pac-10 representative in Rose Bowl
Co-champions vs Rose Bowl See page 137 of Pac-10 Handbook for explanation

Bold Denotes unofficial National Champion recognition

See also

Baseball

Season Conference
1916 CAL
1917 CAL
1918 ORE
1919 WASH
1920 CAL
1921 CAL
1922 WASH
Season North South
1923 WASH CAL
Season Conference
1924 CAL
Season North South
1925 WASH STAN
1926 WASH CAL
Season North CIBA
1927 WSU STM
1928 ORE/WSU STM
1929 WASH CAL
1930 WASH USC
1931 WASH STAN
1932 WASH USC
1933 WSU CAL
1934 ORE CAL
1935 ORE CAL/USC
1936 WSU USC
1937 ORE CAL
1938 OSU/WSU CAL
1939 ORE USC/STM
1940 OSU STM
1941 ORE CAL/STM
1942 ORE USC
1943 ORE ****CAL/USC
1944 WSU UCLA
1945 WSU CAL
1946 ORE USC
1947 WSU CAL/USC
1948 WSU USC***
1949 WSU USC***
1950 WSU*** STAN
1951 OSU USC***
1952 OSU*** USC
1953 ORE STAN***
1954 ORE*** USC
1955 ORE USC***
1956 WSU*** USC
1957 ORE CAL***/USC
1958 OSU USC***
1959 WASH USC***
Season AAWU
1960 WSU CAL/USC
1961 WSU USC
1962 OSU SC
1963 OSU USC
1964 ORE USC
1965 WSU STAN
1966 WSU USC
Season Pac-8
1967 STAN
1968 USC
1969 UCLA
Season North CIBA
1970 WSU USC**
1971 WSU USC**
1972 WSU/ORE USC**
1973 WSU USC**
1974 ORE/WSU USC**
1975 WSU USC**
1976 WSU** UCLA
Season North South
1977 WSU USC**
1978 WSU USC**
1979 WSU UCLA
1980 WSU ARIZ/CAL
1981 WASH ASU
1982 OSU/WSU ASU
1983 OSU STAN
1984 WSU/PSU ASU
1985 WSU STAN
1986 OSU UCLA
1987 WSU STAN
1988 WSU ASU
1989 WSU ARIZ
1990 WSU STAN
1991 WSU USC
1992 WASH ARIZ
1993 WASH ASU
1994 OSU STAN
1995 WSU USC*
1996 WASH USC*
1997 WASH* STAN
1998 WASH* STAN
Season Pac-10 Record
1999 STAN
2000 ASU/STAN/UCLA
2001 USC
2002 USC
2003 STAN
2004 STAN 46-14 (16-8)
2005 OSU 46-12 (19-5)
2006 OSU 50-16 (16-7)
2007 ASU
2008 ASU 49-13 (16-8)

Note: Oregon dropped its baseball program following the 1981 season and will reinstate it in 2009
*denotes North-South playoff champion
**denotes Pac-8 playoff champion
***denotes Pacific Coast Conference playoff champion
****California won the CIBA Division 1 and USC won Division
2. Cal defeated USC in a playfoff for the CIBA title.
LEGEND: PSU = Portland State, SC = Santa Clara
Bold text indicates National Champion

Softball

Conf Ovrl
Year Team W L T Pct W L T Pct
1987 California 8 2 0 0.800 34 15 0 0.694
1988 UCLA 15 3 0 0.833 53 8 0 0.869
1989 UCLA 18 2 0 0.900 48 4 0 0.923
1990 UCLA 16 2 0 0.889 62 7 0 0.899
1991 UCLA 16 4 0 0.800 50 5 0 0.909
1992 Arizona 16 2 0 0.889 58 7 0 0.892
1993 UCLA 25 1 0 0.962 50 5 0 0.909
1994 Arizona 23 1 0 0.958 64 3 0 0.955
1995 Arizona 24 4 0 0.857 66 6 0 0.917
1996 Washington 23 4 0 0.852 59 9 0 0.868
1997 Arizona 26 1 0 0.963 61 5 0 0.924
1998 Arizona 27 1 0 0.964 67 4 0 0.944
1999 UCLA 22 6 0 0.786 63 6 0 0.913
2000 Washington 17 4 0 0.810 62 9 0 0.873
2001 Arizona 19 2 0 0.905 65 4 0 0.942
2002 UCLA 18 3 0 0.857 55 9 0 0.859
2003 Arizona 19 2 0 0.905 54 5 0 0.915
2004 Arizona 17 3 0 0.850 55 6 0 0.902
2005 California
Arizona
Oregon State
Stanford
13
13
13
13
8
8
8
8
0
0
0
0
0.619
0.619
0.619
0.619
52
45
43
43
15
12
16
16
0
0
0
0
0.776
0.789
0.729
0.729
2006 Arizona 15 5 1 0.738 44 12 1 0.781
2007 Arizona 15 5 1 0.738 50 14 1 0.777
2008 Arizona State 18 3 0 .857 64 5 0 .927

Men's Soccer

The conference established men's soccer as a sponsored sport beginning in the 2000 academic year. Prior to then, most members who fielded a men's collegiate soccer team competed in the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation.

Conf Ovrl Conf Ovrl
Season Champion W-L-T W-L-T Runner-Up W-L-T W-L-T
2000 Washington
2001 Stanford
2002 UCLA 8-2-0 16-3-3 California 6-3-1 14-6-2
2003 UCLA 10-0-0 20-2-1 Oregon State 7-3-0 13-7-0
2004 UCLA 6-2-0 14-4-2 California 4-3-1 13-4-3
2005 UCLA 7-1-2 12-5-3 California 6-3-1 14-4-3
2006 California 7-3-0 12-5-1 San Diego State 5-2-3 9-5-4
2007 California 6-3-1 11-5-2 San Diego State
Stanford
UCLA
4-4-2 8-7-4
7-6-5
8-8-3
2008
Note: Not all PAC-10 schools field a men's soccer team.

Women's Soccer

The conference established women's soccer as a sponsored sport beginning in the 1995 academic year.

Conf Ovrl Conf Ovrl
Season Champion W-L-T W-L-T Runner-Up W-L-T W-L-T
1995 Stanford
1996 Stanford
1997 UCLA
1998 California
UCLA
USC
1999 Stanford
2000 Washington
2001 UCLA
2002 Stanford
2003 UCLA 8-0-1 20-2-3 Arizona State 6-2-1 13-5-3
2004 UCLA
Arizona
6-3-0
6-3-0
17-6-0
15-6-0
Washington 5-3-1 17-5-1
2005 UCLA 7-0-2 22-2-2 California 7-1-1 16-4-2
2006 UCLA 8-1-0 17-3-0 Oregon 6-1-2 12-6-2
2007 UCLA 9-0-0 18-1-2 USC 6-2-1 16-3-2
2007 UCLA 9-0-0 18-1-2 USC 6-2-1 16-3-2
2008

Commissioners

PCC

  • Edwin N. Atherton 1940–44
  • Victor O. Schmidt 1944–59

AAWU

  • Thomas J. Hamilton 1959–68

Pacific-8

  • Thomas J. Hamilton 1968–71
  • Wiles Hallock 1971–78

Pacific-10

  • Wiles Hallock 1978–83
  • Thomas C. Hansen 1983–present

References

External links

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