Nonhypotenuse number

Nonhypotenuse number

In mathematics, a nonhypotenuse number is a natural number whose square cannot be written as the sum of two nonzero squares. The name stems from the fact that an edge of length equal to a nonhypotenuse number cannot form the hypotenuse of a right angle triangle with integer sides.

The numbers 1, 2, 3 and 4 are all nonhypotenuse numbers. The number 5, however, is not a nonhypotenuse number as 5^{2} equals 3^{2} + 4^{2}.

The first fifty nonhypotenuse numbers are:

1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 14, 16, 18, 19, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27, 28, 31, 32, 33, 36, 38, 42, 43, 44, 46, 47, 48, 49, 54, 56, 57, 59, 62, 63, 64, 66, 67, 69, 71, 72, 76, 77, 79, 81, 83, 84

Although nonhypotenuse numbers are common among small integers, they become more-and-more sparse for larger numbers. Yet, there are infinitely many nonhypotenuse numbers, and the number of nonhypotenuse numbers not exceeding a value x scales asymptotically with x/√(log x).

The nonhypotenuse numbers are those numbers that have no prime factors of the form 4k+1.

See also

References

Search another word or see Nonhypotenuse numberon Dictionary | Thesaurus |Spanish
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature