Definitions

Nobunaga

Nobunaga

Nobunaga (Nobunaga Oda), 1534-82, Japanese military commander. The son of a daimyo, Nobunaga greatly expanded his father's holdings, becoming master of three provinces near present-day Nagoya. The emperor secretly appealed to him for help, and Nobunaga, acting in the emperor's name, became (1568) dictator of central Japan. Though he restored the ousted shōgun (Nobunaga's ancestry made him ineligible for the title), the real power was his and, aided by his general Hideyoshi Toyotomi and his ally Ieyasu, he unified all Japan except the extreme north and west. He broke the temporal power of the great Buddhist sects by destroying their armies. He was one of the first Japanese generals to supply his foot-soldiers with muskets. The early Jesuits in Japan gained Nobunaga's respect and, thereby, his permission to preach. Under his rule, free trade was encouraged and an era of castle building began. He was murdered by one of his discontented generals before the unification of all Japan, a task that was completed by Hideyoshi and Ieyasu.

(born 1534, Owari province, Japan—died June 21, 1582, Kyōto) With Toyotomi Hideyoshi and Tokugawa Ieyasu, one of the three unifiers of premodern Japan. He brought the domain of his birth, Owari, under his control and followed that success by defeating the huge forces of a neighbouring daimyo. In 1562 he formed an alliance with Ieyasu, and together they captured Kyōto, which Nobunaga controlled from 1573, thereby ending the Ashikaga shogunate (see Muromachi period). He then turned his attention to crushing the militant Tendai Buddhist monks of Enryaku temple, destroying their headquarters in 1571. He spent the next decade fighting the fanatically religious Ikkō sect, defeating their fortress-monastery in Omacrsaka in 1580. His efforts to weaken the strength of the Buddhist temples extended to permitting Jesuit missionaries to build a church in Kyōto; his own interest in Christianity was purely political. In 1582 he had conquered central Japan and was attempting to extend his control over western Japan when he was wounded by a discontented general and committed suicide.

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is a series of turn-based strategy video games first released in 1988 by the Japanese video game developer Koei.

It has been released on a variety of gaming platforms including the Nintendo Entertainment System, Nintendo Game Boy, Sega Mega Drive, 3DO Interactive Multiplayer, Super Nintendo Entertainment System and Sony PlayStation 2 consoles. The title was also released for Macintosh and Amiga personal computers with DOS-compatibility.

Story

Nobunaga's Ambition takes place during the Sengoku period of feudal Japan. As the title suggests, the player is tasked with achieving the ultimate goal of warlord Oda Nobunaga; the conquest and unification of Japan. Selecting Oda Nobunaga is optional, however, as the player is also able to choose from a variety of other regional daimyos of the time.

Gameplay

The player may choose from four campaign scenarios including: "Battle for the East" (beginning in 1560), "Daimyo Power Struggles" (1560), "Ambition Untamed" (1571) and "Road Towards Unification" (1582). In each scenario, the player must allocate resources to raise a capable military force, provide a productive economy to support both military and civilian expansion and support the peasants in order to sustain their respect and loyalty. Gameplay is taken in turns, with each turn in the map view corresponding to a season and each turn during battle corresponding to a day. The player may achieve victory through numerous means, among which are forcing the enemy to retreat, destroying the enemy command unit, or prolonging battle until the opposing force has exhausted its supplies.

Titles in the series

For Nintendo Entertainment System

  • Nobunaga's Ambition
  • Nobunaga's Ambition II

For Sega Mega Drive

  • Nobunaga no Yabou: Zenkoku Han (Japanese release date December 19th, 1991)
  • Nobunaga no Yabou: Bushou Fuuun Roku (Japanese release date September 15th, 1993)
  • Nobunaga no Yabou: Haouden (Japanese release date February 25th, 1994)

For Sega Genesis

  • Nobunaga's Ambition (U.S. release date 1991)

For Super Nintendo

  • Nobunaga's Ambition
  • Nobunaga's Ambition: Lord of Darkness

For Sega Mega CD

  • Nobunaga no Yabou: Haouden (Japanese release date 1994)

For Sony PlayStation:

  • Nobunaga no Yabou: Haouden
  • Nobunaga no Yabou: Tenshoki
  • Nobunaga no Yabou: Returns
  • Nobunaga no Yabou: Shouseiroku
  • Nobunaga no Yabou: Reppuuden

For Sony PlayStation 2:

For handheld systems:

Reception

The Nobunaga's Ambition series has garnered several awards over the years. According to Koei's website, various releases in the series have won Log-In magazine's "BHS Prize", the "Minister of Post & Telecommunications Prize", Nikkei BP's 12th, 13th and 14th annual "Best PC Software" awards and CD-ROM Fan's "Fan of the Year 2001 Grand Prize". Fan reception has been positive, with GameSpot's users rating the original Nobunaga's Ambition an overall score of 8.8 of 10.

See also

References

External links

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