Definitions

Morison

Morison

[mawr-uh-suhn, mor-]
Morison, Samuel Eliot, 1887-1976, American historian, b. Boston. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1912 and began teaching history there in 1915, becoming full professor in 1925 and Jonathan Trumbull professor of American history in 1941. Between 1922 and 1925 he was Harmsworth professor of American history at Oxford. Among his earlier books are The Life and Letters of Harrison Gray Otis, Federalist, 1765-1848 (1913) and The Growth of the American Republic (1930, 6th rev. and enl. ed. 1969), written in collaboration with Henry Steele Commager. In 1926, Morison was appointed the official historian of Harvard and commenced to write the Tercentennial History of Harvard College and University, which was completed in 1936 in three volumes. Two of Morison's books won Pulitzer Prizes: Admiral of the Ocean Sea (1942), a biography of Christopher Columbus, and John Paul Jones (1959). In 1942, Morison was commissioned by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt to write a history of U.S. naval operations in World War II and given the rank of lieutenant commander (he retired from the navy in 1951 as a rear admiral). The 15 volumes of his History of United States Naval Operations in World War II appeared between 1947 and 1962. Although he retired from Harvard in 1955, Morison continued his research and writing.
Morison, Stanley, 1889-1967, English typographer and journalist. Morison was typographical consultant to Cambridge Univ. Press and to the English Monotype Corp. and editor of the Fleuron from 1926 to 1930. He was typographical adviser (1929-44) to the London Times and designer of a new format and a new typeface called Times Roman. In 1945, Morison became editor of The Times Literary Supplement. Among his works on type are Four Centuries of Fine Printing (1924) and First Principles of Typography (1936). His writings cover a wide range and include a multivolume history of The Times.

See biography by N. Barker (1972); study by J. Moran (1971).

(born May 6, 1889, Wanstead, Essex, Eng.—died Oct. 11, 1967, London) English typographer, scholar, and historian of printing. He attained much of his printing and typographic experience by working for publishing houses. He served as editor of the influential typographic journal The Fleuron (1926–30). He worked for The Times (London) in various capacities, including editor of The Times Literary Supplement (1929–60). He is best known as the designer of Times New Roman, which was adopted as The Times's basic typeface in 1932, and went on to become the most successful new typeface of the 20th century.

Learn more about Morison, Stanley with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born July 9, 1887, Boston, Mass., U.S.—died May 15, 1976, Boston) U.S. biographer and historian. He taught at Harvard University for 40 years. To give authenticity to his writings on maritime history, he undertook numerous voyages and during wartime served on 12 ships as a commissioned officer in the U.S. Naval Reserve. His works include Admiral of the Ocean Sea (1942, Pulitzer Prize), on Christopher Columbus; John Paul Jones (1959, Pulitzer Prize); the monumental History of U.S. Naval Operations in World War II, 15 vol. (1947–62); and The Oxford History of the American People (1965).

Learn more about Morison, Samuel Eliot with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born May 6, 1889, Wanstead, Essex, Eng.—died Oct. 11, 1967, London) English typographer, scholar, and historian of printing. He attained much of his printing and typographic experience by working for publishing houses. He served as editor of the influential typographic journal The Fleuron (1926–30). He worked for The Times (London) in various capacities, including editor of The Times Literary Supplement (1929–60). He is best known as the designer of Times New Roman, which was adopted as The Times's basic typeface in 1932, and went on to become the most successful new typeface of the 20th century.

Learn more about Morison, Stanley with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born July 9, 1887, Boston, Mass., U.S.—died May 15, 1976, Boston) U.S. biographer and historian. He taught at Harvard University for 40 years. To give authenticity to his writings on maritime history, he undertook numerous voyages and during wartime served on 12 ships as a commissioned officer in the U.S. Naval Reserve. His works include Admiral of the Ocean Sea (1942, Pulitzer Prize), on Christopher Columbus; John Paul Jones (1959, Pulitzer Prize); the monumental History of U.S. Naval Operations in World War II, 15 vol. (1947–62); and The Oxford History of the American People (1965).

Learn more about Morison, Samuel Eliot with a free trial on Britannica.com.

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