Molly

Molly

[mol-ee]
Pitcher, Molly, 1744-1832, American Revolutionary heroine whose real name was Mary Ludwig Hays or Heis, b. near Trenton, N.J. As the wife of John Hays or Heis, she carried water for her husband and other soldiers in the battle of Monmouth (1778) and earned her nickname. The legend that she manned her husband's gun is apocryphal and possibly rose from confusion with Margaret Corbin. After her husband's death, she married George McCauley, and in 1822 she was pensioned by Pennsylvania.

See W. S. Stryker, The Battle of Monmouth (1927).

byname of Mary Ludwig Hays McCauly

(born 1754, near Trenton, N.J. [U.S.]—died Jan. 22, 1832, Carlisle, Pa., U.S.) U.S. patriot. In the American Revolution, according to legend, she accompanied her husband, William Hays, a gunner, at the Battle of Monmouth (1778), where she carried pitchers of water to American soldiers for cooling the cannons, thereby earning the nickname “Molly Pitcher.” Supposedly, after her husband collapsed from the heat or was wounded, she took his place at the cannon and served heroically through the battle.

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byname of Mary Ludwig Hays McCauly

(born 1754, near Trenton, N.J. [U.S.]—died Jan. 22, 1832, Carlisle, Pa., U.S.) U.S. patriot. In the American Revolution, according to legend, she accompanied her husband, William Hays, a gunner, at the Battle of Monmouth (1778), where she carried pitchers of water to American soldiers for cooling the cannons, thereby earning the nickname “Molly Pitcher.” Supposedly, after her husband collapsed from the heat or was wounded, she took his place at the cannon and served heroically through the battle.

Learn more about Pitcher, Molly with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(1862–76) Secret organization of U.S. coal miners in Pennsylvania and West Virginia. To protest poor working conditions and employment discrimination in the 1860s, the Irish-American miners formed a group named for an Irish widow who had led antilandlord agitators in Ireland. Acts of sabotage and terrorist murders in the coalfields were blamed on the group, and mine owners hired a Pinkerton detective, James McParlan, to infiltrate the organization. Based on his testimony in the widely publicized trials (1875–77), 10 “Mollies” were convicted of murder and hanged.

Learn more about Molly Maguires with a free trial on Britannica.com.

"Candy/Molly's Lips" is a vinyl-only split-single from the American grunge bands The Fluid and Nirvana. It was released in January 1991, and includes the songs "Candy," by The Fluid, and "Molly's Lips," by Nirvana.

The single

"Candy" first appeared on The Fluid's 1990 EP, Glue. The EP was re-released on CD in 1993 along with their 1989 album, Roadmouth.

"Molly's Lips" was recorded live on February 9, 1990, at the Pine Street Theatre in Portland, Oregon. It was written by the Scottish band the Vaselines about Molly Weir, according to band member Eugene Kelly, presumably because her Rentaghost television character Hazel McWitch typically appeared in whiteface with emphatic red lips. According to Michael Azerrad's 1993 Nirvana biography Come as You Are: The Story of Nirvana, the band's singer and guitarist Kurt Cobain was opposed to the release of the track, feeling that this version was not strong. However, the single constituted part of the band's buyout deal from their former record label, Sub Pop Records. "Candy/Molly's Lips" was Nirvana's final release on Sub Pop Records. The word "Later" is etched into the single's run-out groove.

Live versions of Molly's Lips

Apart from the limited edition single released in 1990 Nirvana performed "Molly's Lips" several other times in concert from 1989 to 1993. On August 23, 1991, it was performed live with its author, the Vaselines' Eugene Kelly, at the 1991 Reading Festival in Reading, Berkshire. It was again performed live with Kelly on December 5, 1991 in London, England. On both occasions, Kelly and Cobain shared vocal duties.

Studio version of Molly's Lips

A studio version, recorded on BBC Radio 1 for John Peel in October 1990 in London, England, appears on the 1992 tour EP Hormoaning, and also on the 1992 "odds-and-sods" compilation album Incesticide. This version was released as a 12" vinyl promotional single in Brazil, to promote Incesticide.

References

  • Nirvana Live Guide
  • Azerrad, Michael. Come as You Are: The Story of Nirvana, Doubleday, New York: 1993, ISBN 0-86369-746-1

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