Molly

Molly

[mol-ee]
Pitcher, Molly, 1744-1832, American Revolutionary heroine whose real name was Mary Ludwig Hays or Heis, b. near Trenton, N.J. As the wife of John Hays or Heis, she carried water for her husband and other soldiers in the battle of Monmouth (1778) and earned her nickname. The legend that she manned her husband's gun is apocryphal and possibly rose from confusion with Margaret Corbin. After her husband's death, she married George McCauley, and in 1822 she was pensioned by Pennsylvania.

See W. S. Stryker, The Battle of Monmouth (1927).

byname of Mary Ludwig Hays McCauly

(born 1754, near Trenton, N.J. [U.S.]—died Jan. 22, 1832, Carlisle, Pa., U.S.) U.S. patriot. In the American Revolution, according to legend, she accompanied her husband, William Hays, a gunner, at the Battle of Monmouth (1778), where she carried pitchers of water to American soldiers for cooling the cannons, thereby earning the nickname “Molly Pitcher.” Supposedly, after her husband collapsed from the heat or was wounded, she took his place at the cannon and served heroically through the battle.

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byname of Mary Ludwig Hays McCauly

(born 1754, near Trenton, N.J. [U.S.]—died Jan. 22, 1832, Carlisle, Pa., U.S.) U.S. patriot. In the American Revolution, according to legend, she accompanied her husband, William Hays, a gunner, at the Battle of Monmouth (1778), where she carried pitchers of water to American soldiers for cooling the cannons, thereby earning the nickname “Molly Pitcher.” Supposedly, after her husband collapsed from the heat or was wounded, she took his place at the cannon and served heroically through the battle.

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(1862–76) Secret organization of U.S. coal miners in Pennsylvania and West Virginia. To protest poor working conditions and employment discrimination in the 1860s, the Irish-American miners formed a group named for an Irish widow who had led antilandlord agitators in Ireland. Acts of sabotage and terrorist murders in the coalfields were blamed on the group, and mine owners hired a Pinkerton detective, James McParlan, to infiltrate the organization. Based on his testimony in the widely publicized trials (1875–77), 10 “Mollies” were convicted of murder and hanged.

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