Definitions

Mike "Burnie" Burns

Tyson, Mike

in full Michael Gerald Tyson

(born June 30, 1966, Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S.) U.S. boxer. A member of street gangs in his youth, Tyson was sent to reform school, where his boxing talent was discovered. He turned professional in 1985 and won the heavyweight h1 in 1986 by defeating Trevor Berbick, becoming, at age 20, the youngest heavyweight champion in history. He defended the h1 against Larry Holmes, Michael Spinks, and eight others before losing in an upset to James (“Buster”) Douglas in 1990. In 1992 he was convicted of rape and sentenced to six years in prison; he was released on parole in 1995. In 1996 he challenged but lost to Evander Holyfield; in a 1997 rematch he was disqualified for biting off a piece of Holyfield's ear, and his license was revoked. In 1999 Tyson regained his boxing license and returned to the ring. In his bout against British heavyweight champion Lennox Lewis in 2002, Lewis twice knocked Tyson to the canvas before knocking him out in the eighth round.

Learn more about Tyson, Mike with a free trial on Britannica.com.

orig. Michael Igor Peschkowsky

(born Nov. 6, 1931, Berlin, Ger.) German-born U.S. stage and film director. He and his parents fled Germany for the U.S. in 1938. After studying at the University of Chicago and the Actors Studio, he formed a comic improvisational group in Chicago. He and Elaine May (b. 1932) toured with and recorded a set of brilliant social-satire routines. He later directed several Broadway hits, including Barefoot in the Park (1963), The Odd Couple (1965), and Plaza Suite (1968). His first film, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966), was followed by The Graduate (1967, Academy Award); his later films include Catch-22 (1970), Silkwood (1983), Working Girl (1988), and Primary Colors (1998). His productions focused on the absurdities and horrors of modern life as revealed in personal relationships.

Learn more about Nichols, Mike with a free trial on Britannica.com.

in full Michael Gerald Tyson

(born June 30, 1966, Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S.) U.S. boxer. A member of street gangs in his youth, Tyson was sent to reform school, where his boxing talent was discovered. He turned professional in 1985 and won the heavyweight h1 in 1986 by defeating Trevor Berbick, becoming, at age 20, the youngest heavyweight champion in history. He defended the h1 against Larry Holmes, Michael Spinks, and eight others before losing in an upset to James (“Buster”) Douglas in 1990. In 1992 he was convicted of rape and sentenced to six years in prison; he was released on parole in 1995. In 1996 he challenged but lost to Evander Holyfield; in a 1997 rematch he was disqualified for biting off a piece of Holyfield's ear, and his license was revoked. In 1999 Tyson regained his boxing license and returned to the ring. In his bout against British heavyweight champion Lennox Lewis in 2002, Lewis twice knocked Tyson to the canvas before knocking him out in the eighth round.

Learn more about Tyson, Mike with a free trial on Britannica.com.

orig. Michael Igor Peschkowsky

(born Nov. 6, 1931, Berlin, Ger.) German-born U.S. stage and film director. He and his parents fled Germany for the U.S. in 1938. After studying at the University of Chicago and the Actors Studio, he formed a comic improvisational group in Chicago. He and Elaine May (b. 1932) toured with and recorded a set of brilliant social-satire routines. He later directed several Broadway hits, including Barefoot in the Park (1963), The Odd Couple (1965), and Plaza Suite (1968). His first film, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966), was followed by The Graduate (1967, Academy Award); his later films include Catch-22 (1970), Silkwood (1983), Working Girl (1988), and Primary Colors (1998). His productions focused on the absurdities and horrors of modern life as revealed in personal relationships.

Learn more about Nichols, Mike with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born 1770/80, Fort Pitt, Pa.—died 1823, Fort Henry? [North Dakota]) U.S. keelboatman. He won fame in his youth as a local marksman and Indian scout. Later, when keelboats became the chief vessels of commerce on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, he was known as “king of the keelboatmen.” Renowned as a marksman, roisterer, and champion rough-and-tumble fighter, he became a legendary hero of the American tall tale; even in his own time, his name was synonymous with the braggadocio of Western frontiersmen. He was shot and killed on a fur-trapping expedition to the upper Missouri River.

Learn more about Fink, Mike with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born 1770/80, Fort Pitt, Pa.—died 1823, Fort Henry? [North Dakota]) U.S. keelboatman. He won fame in his youth as a local marksman and Indian scout. Later, when keelboats became the chief vessels of commerce on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, he was known as “king of the keelboatmen.” Renowned as a marksman, roisterer, and champion rough-and-tumble fighter, he became a legendary hero of the American tall tale; even in his own time, his name was synonymous with the braggadocio of Western frontiersmen. He was shot and killed on a fur-trapping expedition to the upper Missouri River.

Learn more about Fink, Mike with a free trial on Britannica.com.

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