Lloyd

Lloyd

[loid]
Lloyd, David, c.1656-1731, political leader in colonial Pennsylvania, b. Wales. Having been commissioned attorney general of Pennsylvania by William Penn, Lloyd arrived in Philadelphia in 1686. He later became a member of the provincial assembly, acting as its speaker and serving in the provincial council on several occasions. After 1703, Lloyd assumed the leadership of the antiproprietary party and was in constant sharp conflict with James Logan. He served as chief justice of Pennsylvania from 1717 until his death.
Lloyd, Harold, 1893-1971, American movie actor, b. Burchard, Kans. Lloyd was famous for his comic portrayals of a wistful innocent with horn-rimmed glasses who blunders in and out of hair-raising situations. His natural style of acting helped to create a believable character that made Lloyd the most popular film comedian of the 1920s. He appeared in over 500 films, including many shorts, spanning both the silent and sound eras; among them were Safety Last (1923), Girl Shy (1924), The Freshman (1925), Movie Crazy (1932), and Mad Wednesday (1947).

See S. Lloyd and J. Vance, Harold Lloyd: Master Comedian (2002).

Lloyd, Henry Demarest, 1847-1903, American reformer, b. New York City. He was on the editorial staff of the Chicago Tribune from 1872 to 1885 but resigned to study social problems. His Wealth against Commonwealth (1894) is an attack on monopolies, based especially on an analysis of the Standard Oil Company. He traveled widely, writing about conditions in various countries and always supporting the causes of the underprivileged.

See biography by C. A. Lloyd (1912); study by C. M. Destler (1963).

Lloyd, Seton Howard Frederick, 1902-96, English archaeologist. Trained originally as an architect, he gained his first archaeological experience in 1928 as a member of the Egypt Exploration Society's expedition to Tell el Amarna. Acting (1930-37) as field supervisor to the Iraq Expedition of the Univ. of Chicago Oriental Institute, he worked at the sites of Tell Asmar and Khafajah. He was (1949-61) director of the British Institute of Archaeology, in Ankara, and (1962-69) professor of archaeology at the Univ. of London. His writings include Ruined Cities of Iraq (1945), Foundations in the Dust (1947), The Art of the Ancient Near East (1961), and Early Highland Peoples of Anatolia (1967).

(born June 8, 1867, Richland Center, Wis., U.S.—died April 9, 1959, Phoenix, Ariz.) U.S. architect. After studying engineering briefly at the University of Wisconsin, he worked for the firm of Dankmar Adler (1844–1900) and Louis Sullivan in Chicago before opening his own practice there in 1893. Wright became the chief practitioner of the Prairie school, building about 50 Prairie houses from 1900 to 1910. Early nonresidential buildings include the forward-looking Larkin Building in Buffalo, N.Y. (1904; destroyed 1950), and Unity Temple in Oak Park, Ill. (1906). In 1911 he began work on his own house, Taliesin, near Spring Green, Wis. The lavish Imperial Hotel in Tokyo (1915–22, dismantled 1967) was significant for its revolutionary floating cantilever construction, which made it one of the only large buildings to withstand the earthquake of 1923. In the 1930s he designed his low-cost Usonian houses, but his most admired house, Fallingwater, in Bear Run, Pa. (1936), is an extravagant country retreat cantilevered over a waterfall. His Johnson Wax Building (1936–39), an example of humane workplace design, touched off an avalanche of major commissions. Of particular note is the Guggenheim Museum (1956–59), which has no separate floor levels but instead uses a spiral ramp, realizing Wright's ideal of a continuous space. Throughout his career he retained the use of ornamental detail, earthy colours, and rich textural effects. His sensitive use of materials helped to control and perfect his dynamic expression of space, which opened a new era in American architecture. Often considered the greatest U.S. architect of all time, his greatest legacy is “organic architecture,” or the idea that buildings harmonize both with their inhabitants and with their environment.

Learn more about Wright, Frank Lloyd with a free trial on Britannica.com.

William Lloyd Garrison.

(born Dec. 10/12, 1805, Newburyport, Mass., U.S.—died May 24, 1879, New York, N.Y.) U.S. journalist and abolitionist. He was editor of the National Philanthropist (Boston) newspaper in 1828 and the Journal of the Times (Bennington, Vt.) in 1828–29, both dedicated to moral reform. In 1829 he and Benjamin Lundy edited the Genius of Universal Emancipation. In 1831 he founded The Liberator, which became the most radical of the antislavery journals. In 1833 he helped found the American Anti-Slavery Society. In 1837 he renounced church and state and embraced the doctrines of Christian “perfectionism,” which combined abolition, women's rights, and nonresistance with the biblical injunction to “come out” from a corrupt society by refusing to obey its laws and support its institutions. His radical blend of pacifism and anarchism precipitated a crisis in the Anti-Slavery Society, a majority of whose members chose to secede when he and his followers voted a series of resolutions admitting women (1840). In the two decades between the schism of 1840 and the American Civil War, Garrison's influence waned as his radicalism increased. Through The Liberator he denounced the Compromise of 1850, the Kansas-Nebraska Act, and the Dred Scott decision and hailed John Brown's raid. During the Civil War he forswore pacifism to support Pres. Abraham Lincoln and welcomed the Emancipation Proclamation. In 1865 he retired but continued to press for women's suffrage, temperance, and free trade.

Learn more about Garrison, William Lloyd with a free trial on Britannica.com.

later Baron Lloyd-Webber

(born March 22, 1948, London, Eng.) British composer. He studied at Oxford and at the Royal College of Music. His first collaboration with lyricist Tim Rice (b. 1944), Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat (1968), was followed by the rock opera Jesus Christ Superstar (1971), which blended classical forms with rock music. Their last major collaboration was Evita (1978). Lloyd Webber's eclectic rock-based works helped revitalize musical theatre. In both London and New York City, his musical Cats (1981), based on poems by T.S. Eliot, became the longest-running musical in history. He later collaborated on Starlight Express (1984), The Phantom of the Opera (1986), and Sunset Boulevard (1993), among other stage works; in 2006 The Phantom of the Opera surpassed Cats to become the longest-running show on Broadway. He was knighted in 1992 and ennobled in 1997.

Learn more about Lloyd Webber, Andrew with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Nov. 28, 1805, Shrewsbury, N.J., U.S.—died Oct. 12, 1852, New York, N.Y.) U.S. traveler and archaeologist. Stephens's travels in the Middle East resulted in two books. With his illustrator friend Frederick Catherwood he embarked for Honduras in 1839 to explore ancient Maya ruins rumoured to exist. At Copán, Uxmal, Palenque, and elsewhere, they identified major new sites. They described their findings in Incidents of Travel in Central America, Chiapas, and Yucatan (1841) and recounted a second trip in Incidents of Travel in Yucatan (1843). Their books created a storm of popular and scholarly interest in the region.

Learn more about Stephens, John Lloyd with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born April 20, 1893, Burchard, Neb., U.S.—died March 8, 1971, Hollywood, Calif.) U.S. film comedian. He began to appear in one-reel comedies in 1913 and mastered the comic chase scene as a member of Mack Sennett's troupe. He joined Hal Roach's company and created his Lonesome Luke character in popular movies such as Just Nuts (1915). He developed his trademark white-faced character wearing round glasses in 1918. Noted for his use of physical danger as a source of laughter, he performed his own daring stunts, hanging from the hands of a clock far above the street in Safety Last (1923) and standing in for a football tackling-dummy in The Freshman (1925). He was the highest paid star of the 1920s. He received a special Academy Award in 1952.

Learn more about Lloyd, Harold with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Jan. 17, 1863, Manchester, Eng.—died March 26, 1945, Ty-newydd, near Llanystumdwy, Caernarvonshire, Wales) British prime minister (1916–22). He entered Parliament in 1890 as a Liberal and retained his seat for 55 years. He served as president of the Board of Trade (1905–08), then as chancellor of the Exchequer (1908–15). Rejection of his controversial “People's Budget” (to raise taxes for social programs) in 1909 by the House of Lords led to a constitutional crisis and passage of the Parliament Act of 1911. He devised the National Insurance Act of 1911, which laid the foundation of the British welfare state. As minister of munitions (1915–16), he used unorthodox methods to ensure that war supplies were forthcoming during World War I. He replaced H.H. Asquith as prime minister in 1916, with Conservative support in his coalition government. His small war cabinet ensured speedy decisions. Distrustful of the competence of the British high command, he was constantly at odds with Gen. Douglas Haig. In the 1918 elections his decision to continue a coalition government further split the Liberal Party. He was one of the three great statesmen responsible for the Treaty of Versailles at the Paris Peace Conference. He began the negotiations that culminated in the Anglo-Irish treaty of 1921. He resigned in 1922 and headed an ailing Liberal Party (1926–31).

Learn more about Lloyd George of Dwyfor, David Lloyd George, Earl with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Nov. 28, 1805, Shrewsbury, N.J., U.S.—died Oct. 12, 1852, New York, N.Y.) U.S. traveler and archaeologist. Stephens's travels in the Middle East resulted in two books. With his illustrator friend Frederick Catherwood he embarked for Honduras in 1839 to explore ancient Maya ruins rumoured to exist. At Copán, Uxmal, Palenque, and elsewhere, they identified major new sites. They described their findings in Incidents of Travel in Central America, Chiapas, and Yucatan (1841) and recounted a second trip in Incidents of Travel in Yucatan (1843). Their books created a storm of popular and scholarly interest in the region.

Learn more about Stephens, John Lloyd with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Aug. 17, 1890, Sioux City, Iowa, U.S.—died Jan. 29, 1946, New York, N.Y.) U.S. New Deal official. He was a social worker in New York City through the 1920s. From 1931 to 1933 he directed the state's emergency relief agency. After Franklin D. Roosevelt became president in 1933, Hopkins was appointed head of the Federal Emergency Relief Administration. In 1935 he created the Works Progress Administration (WPA). After serving as U.S. commerce secretary (1938–40), he made several trips for Roosevelt to London and later to Moscow to discuss economic assistance and military strategy. In 1941 he was put in charge of the lend-lease program. He was regarded as Roosevelt's closest personal adviser during World War II.

Learn more about Hopkins, Harry L(loyd) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Aug. 17, 1890, Sioux City, Iowa, U.S.—died Jan. 29, 1946, New York, N.Y.) U.S. New Deal official. He was a social worker in New York City through the 1920s. From 1931 to 1933 he directed the state's emergency relief agency. After Franklin D. Roosevelt became president in 1933, Hopkins was appointed head of the Federal Emergency Relief Administration. In 1935 he created the Works Progress Administration (WPA). After serving as U.S. commerce secretary (1938–40), he made several trips for Roosevelt to London and later to Moscow to discuss economic assistance and military strategy. In 1941 he was put in charge of the lend-lease program. He was regarded as Roosevelt's closest personal adviser during World War II.

Learn more about Hopkins, Harry L(loyd) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born April 20, 1893, Burchard, Neb., U.S.—died March 8, 1971, Hollywood, Calif.) U.S. film comedian. He began to appear in one-reel comedies in 1913 and mastered the comic chase scene as a member of Mack Sennett's troupe. He joined Hal Roach's company and created his Lonesome Luke character in popular movies such as Just Nuts (1915). He developed his trademark white-faced character wearing round glasses in 1918. Noted for his use of physical danger as a source of laughter, he performed his own daring stunts, hanging from the hands of a clock far above the street in Safety Last (1923) and standing in for a football tackling-dummy in The Freshman (1925). He was the highest paid star of the 1920s. He received a special Academy Award in 1952.

Learn more about Lloyd, Harold with a free trial on Britannica.com.

William Lloyd Garrison.

(born Dec. 10/12, 1805, Newburyport, Mass., U.S.—died May 24, 1879, New York, N.Y.) U.S. journalist and abolitionist. He was editor of the National Philanthropist (Boston) newspaper in 1828 and the Journal of the Times (Bennington, Vt.) in 1828–29, both dedicated to moral reform. In 1829 he and Benjamin Lundy edited the Genius of Universal Emancipation. In 1831 he founded The Liberator, which became the most radical of the antislavery journals. In 1833 he helped found the American Anti-Slavery Society. In 1837 he renounced church and state and embraced the doctrines of Christian “perfectionism,” which combined abolition, women's rights, and nonresistance with the biblical injunction to “come out” from a corrupt society by refusing to obey its laws and support its institutions. His radical blend of pacifism and anarchism precipitated a crisis in the Anti-Slavery Society, a majority of whose members chose to secede when he and his followers voted a series of resolutions admitting women (1840). In the two decades between the schism of 1840 and the American Civil War, Garrison's influence waned as his radicalism increased. Through The Liberator he denounced the Compromise of 1850, the Kansas-Nebraska Act, and the Dred Scott decision and hailed John Brown's raid. During the Civil War he forswore pacifism to support Pres. Abraham Lincoln and welcomed the Emancipation Proclamation. In 1865 he retired but continued to press for women's suffrage, temperance, and free trade.

Learn more about Garrison, William Lloyd with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born June 8, 1867, Richland Center, Wis., U.S.—died April 9, 1959, Phoenix, Ariz.) U.S. architect. After studying engineering briefly at the University of Wisconsin, he worked for the firm of Dankmar Adler (1844–1900) and Louis Sullivan in Chicago before opening his own practice there in 1893. Wright became the chief practitioner of the Prairie school, building about 50 Prairie houses from 1900 to 1910. Early nonresidential buildings include the forward-looking Larkin Building in Buffalo, N.Y. (1904; destroyed 1950), and Unity Temple in Oak Park, Ill. (1906). In 1911 he began work on his own house, Taliesin, near Spring Green, Wis. The lavish Imperial Hotel in Tokyo (1915–22, dismantled 1967) was significant for its revolutionary floating cantilever construction, which made it one of the only large buildings to withstand the earthquake of 1923. In the 1930s he designed his low-cost Usonian houses, but his most admired house, Fallingwater, in Bear Run, Pa. (1936), is an extravagant country retreat cantilevered over a waterfall. His Johnson Wax Building (1936–39), an example of humane workplace design, touched off an avalanche of major commissions. Of particular note is the Guggenheim Museum (1956–59), which has no separate floor levels but instead uses a spiral ramp, realizing Wright's ideal of a continuous space. Throughout his career he retained the use of ornamental detail, earthy colours, and rich textural effects. His sensitive use of materials helped to control and perfect his dynamic expression of space, which opened a new era in American architecture. Often considered the greatest U.S. architect of all time, his greatest legacy is “organic architecture,” or the idea that buildings harmonize both with their inhabitants and with their environment.

Learn more about Wright, Frank Lloyd with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Jan. 17, 1863, Manchester, Eng.—died March 26, 1945, Ty-newydd, near Llanystumdwy, Caernarvonshire, Wales) British prime minister (1916–22). He entered Parliament in 1890 as a Liberal and retained his seat for 55 years. He served as president of the Board of Trade (1905–08), then as chancellor of the Exchequer (1908–15). Rejection of his controversial “People's Budget” (to raise taxes for social programs) in 1909 by the House of Lords led to a constitutional crisis and passage of the Parliament Act of 1911. He devised the National Insurance Act of 1911, which laid the foundation of the British welfare state. As minister of munitions (1915–16), he used unorthodox methods to ensure that war supplies were forthcoming during World War I. He replaced H.H. Asquith as prime minister in 1916, with Conservative support in his coalition government. His small war cabinet ensured speedy decisions. Distrustful of the competence of the British high command, he was constantly at odds with Gen. Douglas Haig. In the 1918 elections his decision to continue a coalition government further split the Liberal Party. He was one of the three great statesmen responsible for the Treaty of Versailles at the Paris Peace Conference. He began the negotiations that culminated in the Anglo-Irish treaty of 1921. He resigned in 1922 and headed an ailing Liberal Party (1926–31).

Learn more about Lloyd George of Dwyfor, David Lloyd George, Earl with a free trial on Britannica.com.

later Baron Lloyd-Webber

(born March 22, 1948, London, Eng.) British composer. He studied at Oxford and at the Royal College of Music. His first collaboration with lyricist Tim Rice (b. 1944), Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat (1968), was followed by the rock opera Jesus Christ Superstar (1971), which blended classical forms with rock music. Their last major collaboration was Evita (1978). Lloyd Webber's eclectic rock-based works helped revitalize musical theatre. In both London and New York City, his musical Cats (1981), based on poems by T.S. Eliot, became the longest-running musical in history. He later collaborated on Starlight Express (1984), The Phantom of the Opera (1986), and Sunset Boulevard (1993), among other stage works; in 2006 The Phantom of the Opera surpassed Cats to become the longest-running show on Broadway. He was knighted in 1992 and ennobled in 1997.

Learn more about Lloyd Webber, Andrew with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Lloyd is a town in Ulster County, New York, United States. The population was 9,941 at the 2000 census.

The Town of Lloyd is located in the eastern part of Ulster County. U.S. Route 9W runs north and south in the eastern part of the town. The concurrent U.S. Route 44 and NY 55 pass through the southeast corner of the town. NY 299 also runs east-west across town. Lloyd is on the opposite side of the Hudson River from Poughkeepsie, New York, to which it is linked by the Mid-Hudson Bridge.

History

The Town of Lloyd was formed from the town of New Paltz, New York in 1845.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 33.4 square miles (86.4 km²), of which, 31.7 square miles (82.2 km²) of it is land and 1.6 square miles (4.2 km²) of it (4.91%) is water.

The east town line, marked by the Hudson River, is the border of Dutchess County, New York.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 9,941 people, 3,626 households, and 2,429 families residing in the town. The population density was 313.3 people per square mile (121.0/km²). There were 3,818 housing units at an average density of 120.3/sq mi (46.5/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 90.29% White, 5.22% African American, 0.16% Native American, 1.22% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.30% from other races, and 1.80% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.07% of the population.

There were 3,626 households out of which 33.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.6% were married couples living together, 10.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.0% were non-families. 25.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 3.09.

In the town the population was spread out with 25.7% under the age of 18, 7.3% from 18 to 24, 30.0% from 25 to 44, 22.5% from 45 to 64, and 14.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 93.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.0 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $52,686, and the median income for a family was $61,584. Males had a median income of $40,774 versus $30,286 for females. The per capita income for the town was $22,299. About 5.1% of families and 7.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.7% of those under age 18 and 10.2% of those age 65 or over.

Communities and locations in Lloyd, NY

  • Chodikee Lake -- A small lake near the north town line.
  • Clintondale Station -- A hamlet in the southwest part of the town.
  • Elting Corners -- A hamlet west of Lloyd village on Route 299.
  • Highland -- A hamlet in the southeast part of the town on Route 9W.
  • Highland Landing -- A location southeast of Highland by the Hudson River.
  • Lloyd -- The hamlet of Lloyd is in the south-central part of the town on Route 299.
  • Oakes -- A location in the southeast part of the town.

References

External links

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