Leonard Wood

Leonard Wood

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Wood, Leonard, 1860-1927, American general and administrator, b. Winchester, N.H. After practicing medicine briefly in Boston, he entered the army in 1885 and was made an assistant surgeon; in 1891 he was promoted to captain. At the outbreak of the Spanish-American War he joined with his friend Theodore Roosevelt in organizing a volunteer cavalry unit—the Rough Riders—and as their commander he participated in the attack on Santiago de Cuba. He was military commander of Santiago (1898-99), and as military governor (1899-1902) of Cuba until the republic was formed, he cooperated in improving sanitary conditions on the island. Sent (1903) to the Philippines as governor of Moro prov., he was promoted (1903) to major general. He helped crush the opposition to U.S. occupation there, although he was criticized for his ruthlessness. From 1906 to 1908 he commanded U.S. military forces in the Philippines. Returning to the United States, he served (1910-14) as U.S. army chief of staff. He was commander (1914-17) of the Dept. of the East and after the outbreak of World War I in Europe led the movement for preparedness in America. He advocated the creation of civilian training camps, which brought him into conflict with the neutralist position of President Wilson, and incurred the President's displeasure. After the U.S. entry into World War I, Wood was refused a commission on the European front. He failed to win the Republican nomination for President in 1920, but he was appointed (1921) governor-general of the Philippines. Distrusting the natives' capacity for self-government, he reversed the lenient policy of his predecessor, F. B. Harrison. Wood liquidated the economic enterprises of the Philippine government, assumed wide powers of control, allowed little prerogative to the legislature, and surrounded himself with military advisers. Until Wood died in 1927, unrest was widespread among the Filipinos, and in 1925 the Philippine senate unanimously voted to hold a plebiscite on independence. The report of the Thompson Commission, sent to the islands in 1926, sharply criticized Wood's rule.

See biography by H. Hagedorn (1931, repr. 1969).

(born Oct. 9, 1860, Winchester, N.H., U.S.—died Aug. 7, 1927, Boston, Mass.) U.S. army officer. He studied medicine and became a contract surgeon with the U.S. Army. In the Spanish-American War he and his friend Theodore Roosevelt recruited and commanded the volunteer Rough Riders. Promoted to brigadier general, Wood served as military governor of Cuba (1899–1902) and organized a modern civil government. After service in the Philippines, he was chief of staff of the U.S. Army (1910–14). Though he had advocated preparedness for war, as a Republican he was passed over for a command post in World War I by the Democratic administration. He later served as governor general of the Philippines (1921–27).

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Fort Leonard Wood is a census-designated place (CDP) in Pulaski County, Missouri, United States. The population was 13,666 at the 2000 census. It is named in honor of Major General Leonard Wood, who was awarded the Medal of Honor. The Fort Leonard Wood Micropolitan Statistical Area comprises Pulaski County.

Interstate 44 passes through the area; before that, the highway was U.S. Route 66.

Geography

Fort Leonard Wood is located at (37.738191, -92.117275).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 97.6 square miles (252.8 km²), of which, 97.2 square miles (251.7 km²) of it is land and 0.4 square miles (1.1 km²) of it (0.43%) is water.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 13,667 people, 2,639 households, and 2,335 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 140.6 people per square mile (54.3/km²). There were 3,151 housing units at an average density of 32.4/sq mi (12.5/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 64.81% White, 21.59% African American, 1.10% Native American, 2.39% Asian, 0.45% Pacific Islander, 4.99% from other races, and 4.68% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 11.43% of the population.

There were 2,639 households out of which 71.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 80.0% were married couples living together, 5.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 11.5% were non-families. 7.0% of all households were made up of individuals and none had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.32 and the average family size was 3.54.

In the CDP the population was spread out with 27.8% under the age of 18, 35.0% from 18 to 24, 35.8% from 25 to 44, 1.3% from 45 to 64, and 0.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 21 years. For every 100 females there were 158.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 181.4 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $33,891, and the median income for a family was $34,354. Males had a median income of $24,732 versus $20,421 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $11,652. About 2.7% of families and 4.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.6% of those under age 18 and none of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Waynesville Regional Airport at Forney Field serves the community.

References

External links

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