Jesuit

Jesuit

[jezh-oo-it, jez-oo-, jez-yoo-]
Jesuit: see Jesus, Society of.

Member of the Roman Catholic order of religious men called the Society of Jesus. First organized by St. Ignatius of Loyola in 1534 at the University of Paris, the order was approved by Pope Paul III in 1540. It discontinued many practices of medieval religious life, such as obligatory penances and fasts and a common uniform, and instead focused on military-style mobility and adaptability. Its organization was characterized by centralized authority, probation lasting many years before final vows, and special obedience to the pope. The Jesuits served as a preaching, teaching, and missionary society, actively promoting the Counter-Reformation, and by the time of Ignatius's death in 1556 their efforts were already worldwide. The success of their enterprise and their championship of the pope earned them much hostility from both religious and political foes. Under pressure from France, Spain, and Portugal, Pope Clement XIV abolished the order in 1773, but it was restored by Pius VII in 1814. The Jesuits have since become the largest male religious order.

Learn more about Jesuit with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Robert Persons (born June 24 1546, Nether Stowey, Somerset, England - died April 15 1610, Rome), later known as Robert Parsons, was an English Jesuit priest.

Life

He accompanied Edmund Campion (who was later canonized) on Campion's mission to aid English Catholics in 1580.

The Jesuit General, Everard Mercurian, had been reluctant to involve the Jesuits directly in the political machinations of the pope against England. The mission was further compromised because the pope had sent a separate group, unbeknownst to the Jesuit mission, to support the Irish rebel, James Fitzmaurice Fitzgerald. Parsons and Campion learned of this in Reims while en route to England. After Campion's capture, torture, and execution, Parsons left England, never to return.

He was associated with Cardinal William Allen in his hopes of a swift conquest of England by the Spanish Armada. With the failure of that enterprise, he spent nine years in Spain.

Recalled to Rome in 1585, he was professed there 7 May, 1587 and sent to Spain at the close of 1588, to conciliate King Philip, who was offended with Father Acquaviva. Persons was successful, and then made use of the royal favour to found the seminaries of Valladolid, Seville, and Madrid (1589, 1592, 1598) and the residences of San-Lucar and of Lisbu (which became a college in 1622). Already in 1582 he had founded a school at Eu, in Picardy, in France, the first English Catholic boys' school since the Reformation; and he now succeeded in establishing at St Omer (1594) a larger institution to which the boys from Eu were transferred, and which, after a long and romantic history, still flourishes as Stonyhurst College at Stonyhurst.

In 1596, in Seville, he wrote Memorial for the Reformation of England, which gave in some detail a blueprint for the kind of society England was to become after its return to the faith.

He had hoped to succeed Allen as Cardinal on the latter's death. Unsuccessful, he was rewarded with the rectorship of the English College at Rome, the most important seminary for English Catholic priests.

Sources

  • Hogge, Alice. God's Secret Agents; Elizabeth's Forbidden Priests and the Hatching of the Gunpowder Plot. HarperCollins: 2005.
  • Ceri Sullivan, Dismembered Rhetoric. English Recusant Writing, 1580 1603 (Madison/London: Associated University Press, 1995).

References

Search another word or see Jesuiton Dictionary | Thesaurus |Spanish
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;