Hernando

Hernando

Pizarro, Hernando, fl. 1530-60, Spanish conquistador, half brother of Francisco Pizarro. Much older than his half brothers, Francisco, Juan, and Gonzalo, and, unlike them, legitimate by birth and educated, Hernando accompanied Francisco from Spain in 1530. After the conquest he returned (1533) to advance the fortunes of the family at court at the expense of Diego de Almagro, Francisco's partner. In 1536, back in Peru, he defended (1536-37) Cuzco against the Inca Manco Capac. Hernando then fought against Diego de Almagro, was captured (1537), released, and returned (1538) to defeat and execute Almagro. Because of his standing at court, he was sent (1539) to Spain to argue the cause of the Pizarros in the recent civil war, but bribery was not enough. Hernando suffered mild imprisonment for 20 years. Released in 1560, he died some time later, according to one chronicler at the age of 100.
De Soto, Hernando, c.1500-1542, Spanish explorer. After serving under Pedro Arias de Ávila in Central America and under Francisco Pizarro in Peru, the dashing young conquistador was made governor of Cuba by Emperor Charles V, with the right to conquer Florida (meaning the North American mainland). He led an expedition that left Spain in 1538 and landed on the Florida coast, probably near Tampa Bay, in 1539. That was the start of an adventure that took him and his band nearly halfway across the continent in search of gold, silver, and jewels, which they never found.

After wintering near Tallahassee they went N through Georgia and the Carolinas into Tennessee, then turned S into Alabama, where De Soto was wounded in a battle with Native Americans. He was so determined to continue his treasure hunt that he refused to inform his men that Spanish vessels were off the coast. In the spring of 1541 they again set forth and were probably the first Europeans to see and cross the Mississippi. A journey up the Arkansas River and into Oklahoma disclosed no treasures, and, discouraged, they turned back to the banks of the Mississippi. There De Soto died; he was buried in the river, so that the Native Americans, whom he had intimidated and ill-used, would not learn of his death.

His men went west again across the Red River into N Texas, then returned to the Mississippi and followed it to the sea. A remnant of the expedition made its way down the coast to arrive at Veracruz in 1543. The chief chronicle of the expedition is by a Portuguese called the Gentleman of Elvas.

See biographies by R. B. C. Graham (1924), T. Maynard (1930, repr. 1969), B. Shipp (1831, repr. 1971), and M. Albornoz (1986); studies by R. F. Schell (1966) and P. Lily (1983).

Cortez, Hernando: see Cortés, Hernán.
Arias de Saavedra, Hernando, known as Hernandarias, 1561-1634, Spanish colonial governor, b. Asunción, in present-day Paraguay. An able administrator, he was elected (1592) lieutenant governor of Asunción by the cabildo and was chosen governor of Río de la Plata prov. three times (1597-99, 1602-9, 1614-18). He consolidated the Spanish settlements, pacified the Native Americans, introduced public schools, and stimulated the growth of Buenos Aires. In 1617 he secured a royal order for the separation of Paraguay (then Guairá) from Río de la Plata, and granted the Jesuits territorial privileges for the religious colonization of the region.

(born circa 1496/97, Jerez de los Caballeros, Badajoz, Spain—died May 21, 1542, along the Mississippi River) Spanish explorer and conquistador. He joined the 1514 expedition of Pedro Arias Dávila (1440–1531) to the West Indies, and in Panama he quickly made his mark as a trader and explorer. By 1520 he had accumulated a small fortune through his slave trading in Nicaragua and on the Isthmus of Panama. He joined Francisco Pizarro on an expedition to conquer Peru in 1532, returning to Spain in 1536 with great wealth. Commissioned by the Spanish crown to conquer what is now Florida, he departed in 1538 in command of 10 ships and 700 men. On that expedition he explored the extensive region that was to become the southeastern U.S. and discovered the Mississippi River for Europeans. Overcome by fever, he died in Louisiana and was buried in the Mississippi River.

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(born circa 1496/97, Jerez de los Caballeros, Badajoz, Spain—died May 21, 1542, along the Mississippi River) Spanish explorer and conquistador. He joined the 1514 expedition of Pedro Arias Dávila (1440–1531) to the West Indies, and in Panama he quickly made his mark as a trader and explorer. By 1520 he had accumulated a small fortune through his slave trading in Nicaragua and on the Isthmus of Panama. He joined Francisco Pizarro on an expedition to conquer Peru in 1532, returning to Spain in 1536 with great wealth. Commissioned by the Spanish crown to conquer what is now Florida, he departed in 1538 in command of 10 ships and 700 men. On that expedition he explored the extensive region that was to become the southeastern U.S. and discovered the Mississippi River for Europeans. Overcome by fever, he died in Louisiana and was buried in the Mississippi River.

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Hernando is a census-designated place (CDP) in Citrus County, Florida, United States. The population was 8,253 at the 2000 census.

Geography

Hernando is located at (28.929498, -82.374340).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 35.4 square miles (91.6 km²), of which, 31.5 square miles (81.5 km²) of it is land and 3.9 square miles (10.1 km²) of it (11.02%) is water.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 8,253 people, 3,730 households, and 2,514 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 262.2 people per square mile (101.2/km²). There were 4,750 housing units at an average density of 150.9/sq mi (58.3/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 95.58% White, 2.27% African American, 0.29% Native American, 0.52% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.17% from other races, and 1.11% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.64% of the population.

There were 3,730 households out of which 18.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.8% were married couples living together, 7.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.6% were non-families. 26.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.21 and the average family size was 2.62.

In the CDP the population was spread out with 17.2% under the age of 18, 4.9% from 18 to 24, 20.8% from 25 to 44, 29.1% from 45 to 64, and 28.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 51 years. For every 100 females there were 97.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.9 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $29,121, and the median income for a family was $35,118. Males had a median income of $26,084 versus $21,460 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $15,030. About 11.6% of families and 15.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 25.7% of those under age 18 and 11.0% of those age 65 or over.

References

External links

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