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Granados

Granados

[grah-nah-thaws]
Granados, Enrique, 1867-1916, Spanish composer and pianist, b. Havana; studied at Barcelona with Felipe Pedrell. His most significant works are those for the piano in which he created the peculiarly Spanish manner later used by de Falla. Goyescas (1911), a set of piano pieces that later formed the basis for an opera of the same name, is his outstanding work. He appeared as a pianist in Paris and Spain, and Casals and Saint-Saëns were among artists who performed with him and admired his style.

(born July 27, 1867, Lérida, Spain—died March 24, 1916, at sea) Spanish composer. He studied composition with Felipe Pedrell and concertized as a pianist. From 1901 he taught at the Academia Granados, the music school he founded in Barcelona. He wrote four zarzuelas, including María del Carmen (1898), and two “poemas” (also stage works), as well as songs and chamber works. His fame rests on the piano suite Goyescas (1911). His opera of the same name was performed successfully at New York's Metropolitan Opera in 1916. Returning to Spain from this performance, Granados was drowned when his ship was torpedoed by a German submarine.

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