Gard

Gard

[gar]
Gard, department (1990 pop. 591,700), S France, on the Rhône River and the Mediterranean Sea. Nǐmes is the capital.

(born Oct. 7, 1888, Adair county, Iowa, U.S.—died Nov. 18, 1965, Danbury, Conn.) U.S. politician. An agricultural expert, he succeeded his father as editor of Wallace's Farmer (1924–33). In 1932 he helped Franklin D. Roosevelt win Iowa. As U.S. secretary of agriculture (1933–40), he shaped the administration's farm policy, including the Agricultural Adjustment Administration. He served as vice president during Roosevelt's third term but was replaced in 1944 by Harry S. Truman. He was later secretary of commerce (1945–46). Very liberal in his views, he helped form the Progressive Party in 1948 and was its candidate against Truman in the presidential election, receiving more than one million votes. He wrote several books, including Sixty Million Jobs (1945).

Learn more about Wallace, Henry A(gard) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born March 23, 1881, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France—died Aug. 22, 1958, Bellême) French novelist and dramatist. Originally trained as a paleographer and archivist, he brought to his literary works a spirit of objectivity and a scrupulous regard for detail. He first attracted attention with the novel Jean Barois (1913), the story of an intellectual torn between the Roman Catholic faith of his childhood and the scientific materialism of his maturity. He is best known for the eight-novel cycle Les Thibault (1922–40), the record of a family's development that chronicles the social and moral issues facing the French bourgeoisie in the pre-World War I era. He received the 1937 Nobel Prize for Literature.

Learn more about Martin du Gard, Roger with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born March 23, 1881, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France—died Aug. 22, 1958, Bellême) French novelist and dramatist. Originally trained as a paleographer and archivist, he brought to his literary works a spirit of objectivity and a scrupulous regard for detail. He first attracted attention with the novel Jean Barois (1913), the story of an intellectual torn between the Roman Catholic faith of his childhood and the scientific materialism of his maturity. He is best known for the eight-novel cycle Les Thibault (1922–40), the record of a family's development that chronicles the social and moral issues facing the French bourgeoisie in the pre-World War I era. He received the 1937 Nobel Prize for Literature.

Learn more about Martin du Gard, Roger with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Gard (Occitan: Gard) is a département located in southern France in the Languedoc-Roussillon region. It is named after the river Gardon (or Gard).

History

The Gard area was settled by the Romans in classical times. It was crossed by the Via Domitia, which was constructed in 118 BC.

Gard is one of the original 83 departments created during the French Revolution on March 4, 1790. It was created from the ancient province of Languedoc.

Geography

Gard is part of the region of Languedoc-Roussillon and is surrounded by the department of Hérault, Lozère, Aveyron, Bouches-du-Rhône, Vaucluse, and Ardèche.

The highest point in the department is the Mont Aigoual.

Serious flooding has occurred in the department in recent years.

Tourism

Gard contains a part of the Cévennes National Park.

There are important Roman architectural remains in Nîmes, as well as the Pont du Gard Roman aqueduct.

See also

External links

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