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Fannie

Fannie

[fan-ee]
Hurst, Fannie, 1889-1968, American author, b. Hamilton, Ohio, grad. Washington Univ., 1909. She is noted for her sympathetic, sentimental novels including Lummox (1923), Back Street (1930), Imitation of Life (1933), and God Must Be Sad (1961).

See biography by B. Kroeger (1999).

(born March 23, 1857, Boston, Mass., U.S.—died Jan. 15, 1915, Boston) U.S. cookery expert. She became director of the Boston Cooking School in 1894 and in 1896 published The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book. Standardizing the methods and measurements of recipes, it became one of the best-selling cookbooks of all time; its modern versions were h1d The Fannie Farmer Cookbook. In 1902 she established Miss Farmer's School of Cookery, with courses designed to train housewives rather than teachers of cookery.

Learn more about Farmer, Fannie (Merritt) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born March 23, 1857, Boston, Mass., U.S.—died Jan. 15, 1915, Boston) U.S. cookery expert. She became director of the Boston Cooking School in 1894 and in 1896 published The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book. Standardizing the methods and measurements of recipes, it became one of the best-selling cookbooks of all time; its modern versions were h1d The Fannie Farmer Cookbook. In 1902 she established Miss Farmer's School of Cookery, with courses designed to train housewives rather than teachers of cookery.

Learn more about Farmer, Fannie (Merritt) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

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