Expansions of Final Fantasy XI

List of Final Fantasy media

This is a list of media related to the video game series. Final Fantasy is a series of console role playing games developed and published by Square Enix (formerly Square). Its first game premiered in Japan in 1987, and Final Fantasy games have subsequently been localized for markets in North America, Europe and Australia, on nearly every video game console since the Nintendo Entertainment System, including MSX2, Super Nintendo, PlayStation, WonderSwan (Color), PlayStation 2, IBM PC, Game Boy Advance, Nintendo GameCube, Nintendo DS, Xbox 360, and several models of mobile phone. Future games have been announced for Wii, Nintendo DS, PlayStation Portable, and PlayStation 3 game systems. Final Fantasy is Square Enix's most successful franchise, having sold over 80 million units worldwide to date, including tactical role-playing games, portable games, MMORPGs, and games for mobile phones, in addition to console role-playing games. Its popularity has placed it as the fourth-best-selling video game franchise, among other honors.

As of 2008, twelve games have been released as part of the main (numbered) series, as well as many spin-offs and related titles. Each game in the main series takes place in a different fictional universe, though beginning with Final Fantasy X-2, video games set in main series games' worlds have been released. In addition to video games, Final Fantasy has spawned several anime, movies, novels and manga, as well as a few radio dramas. Many games, particularly the main series, have several companion soundtracks with music from the games. Since the announcement of Compilation of Final Fantasy VII, Square Enix has focused on "polymorphic content", expanding each game world with material on many video game platforms, as well as other forms of media.

Video games

Originally, Final Fantasy II and III for the Famicom and V for the Super Famicom were not released in America. For number continuity, Square of America changed the numerals of the US releases: Final Fantasy IV became "II" and VI became "III". Starting with Final Fantasy VII the pretense was dropped, and all subsequent games used their original numbering, leading to an apparent "jump" over 3 games. This has been a source of much confusion, with many American fans continuing to refer to IV and VI by their American numbers. To solve this, many fans used to use the disambiguating suffixes "us" and "j" for American numbering and Japanese numbering respectively, e.g. "FF3us" and "FF6j" refer to the same game. This practice has practically ceased since the later ports began to include translations of the Japanese games with their original numbering.

Main series

Game Original release date
Japan North America PAL region
Final Fantasy December 18, 1987 July 12, 1990
Notes:

Final Fantasy II December 17, 1988
Notes:

Final Fantasy III April 27, 1990 November 14, 2006 (Nintendo DS remake)
Notes:

  • Released on Famicom
  • Ported to Nintendo DS (2006)
  • The Nintendo DS version is the first version officially released outside of Japan. It is a full remake of the game with 3D graphics and refined gameplay.

Final Fantasy IV July 19, 1991 November 23, 1991
Notes:

Final Fantasy V December 6, 1992
Notes:

Final Fantasy VI April 2, 1994 October 11, 1994
Notes:

Final Fantasy VII January 31, 1997 September 7, 1997 November 1, 1997
Notes:

Final Fantasy VIII February 11, 1999 September 9, 1999 October 27, 1999
Notes:

Final Fantasy IX July 7, 2000 November 14, 2000 February 16, 2001
Notes:

Final Fantasy X July 19, 2001 December 20, 2001 May 24, 2002
Notes:

Final Fantasy XI May 16, 2002 October 28, 2003 September 16, 2004
Notes:

Final Fantasy XII March 16, 2006 October 31, 2006 February 23, 2007
Notes:

Final Fantasy XIII TBA TBA TBA
Notes:

Main series sequels, prequels, and sidestories

Until the release of Final Fantasy X-2 the idea of a "direct sequel," that is, a game which directly relates to the story or world from a previous game in the series, was unprecedented in the series. Starting with that game, however, several such sequels, and eventually, prequels and spinoffs, emerged, especially the Compilation of Final Fantasy VII series of media, all of which expand the story of the game Final Fantasy VII.
Game Original release date
Japan North America PAL region
Final Fantasy Tactics June 20, 1997 January 28, 1998
Notes:

Final Fantasy Tactics Advance February 14, 2003 September 8, 2003 October 24, 2003
Notes:

Final Fantasy X-2 March 13, 2003 November 18, 2003 February 20, 2004
Notes:

Final Fantasy IV the After: Tsuki no Kikan February 18, 2008
Notes:

Compilation of Final Fantasy VII

Game Original release date
Japan North America PAL region
Before Crisis: Final Fantasy VII September 29, 2004 TBA TBA
Note:

Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII January 26, 2006 August 15, 2006 November 17, 2006
Note:

  • Released on PlayStation 2
  • Sequel to Final Fantasy VII, taking place three years after Final Fantasy VII
  • A "lost episode" was released August 18, 2006 which takes places midway through Dirge of Cerberus
  • International version released in Japan for PlayStation 2 on 4 September 2008

Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII September 13, 2007 March 25, 2008 June 26, 2008
Note:

Ivalice Alliance

Game Original release date
Japan North America PAL region
Final Fantasy XII: Revenant Wings April 26, 2007 November 20, 2007 February 15, 2008
Note:

Final Fantasy Tactics: The War of the Lions May 10, 2007 October 9, 2007 October 5, 2007
Note:

Final Fantasy Tactics A2: Grimoire of the Rift October 25, 2007 June 24, 2008 TBA
Note:

Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy XIII

Game Original release date
Japan North America PAL region
Final Fantasy Agito XIII TBA TBA TBA
Note:

Final Fantasy Versus XIII TBA TBA TBA
Note:

  • To be released on PlayStation 3
  • Announced at E³ 2006, director Tetsuya Nomura describes it as "not merely a sequel to Final Fantasy XIII, but a wholly independent story unfolding in a different world with different characters".

Spin-offs

Compilations and collections

Film and television

Companion books

Novels and manga

Radio drama

Music and soundtracks

Most of the music of Final Fantasy was composed by Nobuo Uematsu. Traditionally, each game has an original soundtrack, as well as a piano arrangement version. Recently, concert tours of Final Fantasy music have been organized, such as Dear Friends -Music from Final Fantasy-. Uematsu left Square Enix in 2004 and musical duties have been given to various composers such as Hitoshi Sakimoto, although Uematsu still does contract work through his company Smile Please.

See also

References

Sources

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