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Emmet

Emmet

[em-it]
Emmet, Robert, 1778-1803, Irish nationalist and revolutionary. He studied at Trinity College, Dublin, but left in 1798 because of his nationalist sympathies. In 1800 he went to France, where with exiled United Irishmen he planned a French-aided uprising in Ireland. Returning (1802) to Ireland, he scheduled the uprising for the summer of 1803. The insurrection, which took place in July, 1803, ended in utter confusion. Emmet himself, who had attempted a march on Dublin Castle with about 100 men, fled. However, he returned to Dublin soon after, partly to be near Sarah Curran, daughter of John Philpot Curran. He was captured, tried, and hanged. Leonard MacNally, his attorney, was in the pay of the crown, and many of Emmet's associates were informers for the British government. Emmet became a hero of Irish nationalists, largely on the basis of his stirring speech from the scaffold.

See biography by L. O'Broin (1958); study by H. Landreth (1964).

Emmet, Thomas Addis, 1764-1827, Irish-American lawyer, b. Cork, Ireland, grad. Trinity College, Dublin, 1782; brother of Robert Emmet. He was trained in medicine at the Univ. of Edinburgh but abandoned that field for law and gained a brilliant reputation as a barrister in Ireland, particularly in defending members of the Society of United Irishmen. Imprisoned in 1798 for his activities in the Irish cause, he was later released on condition of perpetual exile and emigrated to the United States in 1804. He established a practice in New York and became one of the most notable American lawyers. His interest in the Irish cause continued, and he was of invaluable assistance to many of the early Irish immigrants who came to America.

(born April 4, 1896, New Rochelle, N.Y., U.S.—died Nov. 14, 1955, New York, N.Y.) U.S. playwright. Sherwood was a magazine editor in New York City and a member of the Algonquin Round Table, the centre of a New York literary coterie. He examined the pointlessness of war in his first play, The Road to Rome (1927). Idiot's Delight (1936), Abe Lincoln in Illinois (1938), and There Shall Be No Night (1940) won Pulitzer prizes. In 1938 he cofounded the Playwrights' Company, which became a major producing company. During World War II he wrote speeches for Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt and headed the overseas branch of the Office of War Information (1941–44). His book Roosevelt and Hopkins (1948) won a Pulitzer Prize. Many of his plays were adapted for film; his original screenplays include The Best Years of Our Lives (1946, Academy Award).

Learn more about Sherwood, Robert E(mmet) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born April 4, 1896, New Rochelle, N.Y., U.S.—died Nov. 14, 1955, New York, N.Y.) U.S. playwright. Sherwood was a magazine editor in New York City and a member of the Algonquin Round Table, the centre of a New York literary coterie. He examined the pointlessness of war in his first play, The Road to Rome (1927). Idiot's Delight (1936), Abe Lincoln in Illinois (1938), and There Shall Be No Night (1940) won Pulitzer prizes. In 1938 he cofounded the Playwrights' Company, which became a major producing company. During World War II he wrote speeches for Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt and headed the overseas branch of the Office of War Information (1941–44). His book Roosevelt and Hopkins (1948) won a Pulitzer Prize. Many of his plays were adapted for film; his original screenplays include The Best Years of Our Lives (1946, Academy Award).

Learn more about Sherwood, Robert E(mmet) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Emmet is a city in Hempstead and Nevada counties in the U.S. state of Arkansas. The population was 506 at the 2000 census.

Geography

Emmet is located at (33.726411, -93.471340).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.5 square miles (3.9 km²), all of it land.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 506 people, 186 households, and 129 families residing in the city. The population density was 333.4 people per square mile (128.5/km²). There were 220 housing units at an average density of 145.0/sq mi (55.9/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 77.67% White, 20.16% Black or African American, 0.40% Native American, 0.20% from other races, and 1.58% from two or more races. 0.40% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 186 households out of which 39.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.8% were married couples living together, 16.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.6% were non-families. 26.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.72 and the average family size was 3.31.

In the city the population was spread out with 32.2% under the age of 18, 7.5% from 18 to 24, 30.4% from 25 to 44, 18.8% from 45 to 64, and 11.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 98.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.4 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $22,386, and the median income for a family was $26,250. Males had a median income of $24,107 versus $22,250 for females. The per capita income for the city was $11,726. About 30.0% of families and 33.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 47.4% of those under age 18 and 20.0% of those age 65 or over.

References

External links

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