Drummond

Drummond

[druhm-uhnd]
Drummond, Henry, 1786-1860, English banker, known particularly as one of the founders of the Catholic Apostolic Church. Beginning in 1826, he gathered annually for five years, at his home in Surrey, a group of laity and clergy to examine the prophecies in the Scriptures. Out of these meetings grew the organization of the Catholic Apostolic Church under Edward Irving. Drummond became an apostle of the church in 1832. From 1847 until his death, he was a member of Parliament.
Drummond, Henry, 1851-97, Scottish clergyman and author, educated at the Univ. of Edinburgh. He was a minister of the Free Church and from 1877 a lecturer on science in Free Church College, Glasgow. Deeply interested in the reconciliation of science and religion, he wrote Natural Law in the Spiritual World (1883). After travels in Africa he published Tropical Africa (1888), and The Ascent of Man is a collection of the Lowell Lectures he delivered in Boston in 1893. A sermon, The Greatest Thing in the World (1890), has been reprinted many times.
Drummond, James Eric: see Perth, James Eric Drummond, 16th earl of.
Drummond, William, 1585-1649, Scottish poet. He was educated at Edinburgh and in France, retiring in 1610 to Hawthornden, where he spent his life as a gentleman of letters. His first volume of verse, Teares on the Death of Moeliades (1613), was followed by Poems (1616), Forth Feasting (1617), and Flowres of Sion (1623). The poems in these volumes show a strong Italian, especially Petrarchan, influence. His prose works include A Cypresse Grove (1623, an essay on death) and a history of Scotland (1655). The visit of Ben Jonson to Hawthornden (1618-19) resulted in Drummond's notes of Jonson's conversations.

See his poetical works ed. by L. E. Kastner (1913, repr. 1969); biography by D. Masson (1873, repr. 1969).

Drummond, William Henry, 1854-1907, Canadian poet, b. Ireland. For several years he worked and practiced medicine in frontier Canadian communities. There he came to know the French Canadians, whom he celebrated in his best poems, using their dialect of English. His published volumes include The Habitant (1897), Johnnie Courteau (1901), The Voyageur (1905), and his complete Poetical Works (1912).

(born Aug. 2, 1891, London, Eng.—died March 27, 1975, London) British composer. He studied with Ralph Vaughan Williams and Gustav Holst. Though he was compositionally adventurous at first, he later adopted a conservative, Romantic style. His works include A Colour Symphony (1922), Pastoral (1928), the choral symphony Morning Heroes (1930), Music for Strings (1936), and the ballets Checkmate (1937) and Miracle in the Gorbals (1944).

Learn more about Bliss, Sir Arthur (Edward Drummond) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Aug. 2, 1891, London, Eng.—died March 27, 1975, London) British composer. He studied with Ralph Vaughan Williams and Gustav Holst. Though he was compositionally adventurous at first, he later adopted a conservative, Romantic style. His works include A Colour Symphony (1922), Pastoral (1928), the choral symphony Morning Heroes (1930), Music for Strings (1936), and the ballets Checkmate (1937) and Miracle in the Gorbals (1944).

Learn more about Bliss, Sir Arthur (Edward Drummond) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Drummond is a city in Fremont County, Idaho, United States. The population was 15 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Rexburg, Idaho Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Geography

Drummond is located at (43.999147, -111.343769).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.1 square miles (0.3 km²), all of it land.

Drummond is east of U.S. Highway 20 on State Highway 32.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 15 people, 7 households, and 3 families residing in the city. The population density was 139.9 people per square mile (52.7/km²). There were 12 housing units at an average density of 111.9/sq mi (42.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 100.00% White. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.67% of the population.

There were 7 households out of which none had children under the age of 18 living with them, 28.6% were married couples living together, 14.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 57.1% were non-families. 42.9% of all households were made up of individuals and none had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.14 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the city the population was spread out with 6.7% under the age of 18, 20.0% from 18 to 24, 33.3% from 25 to 44, 26.7% from 45 to 64, and 13.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 114.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 133.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $12,500, and the median income for a family was $52,917. Males had a median income of $36,250 versus $0 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,164. There were no families and 35.7% of the population living below the poverty line, including no under eighteens and none of those over 64.

References

External links

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