Dixon

Dixon

[dik-suhn]
Dixon, Thomas, 1864-1946, American novelist, b. Shelby, N.C., grad. Wake Forest College. A militant Southerner, he is best known for his novel The Clansman (1905), on which the movie The Birth of a Nation (1915) was based.
Dixon, city (1990 pop. 15,144), seat of Lee co., N Ill., on the Rock River; founded 1830, inc. 1857. Corn and soybeans are grown, cattle are raised, and there is light manufacturing. On the site of the Dixon Blockhouse is a statue of Abraham Lincoln as a youthful captain in the Black Hawk War. A correctional center is in Dixon.

David Dixon Porter, photograph; in the Mathew Brady collection

(born June 8, 1813, Chester, Pa., U.S.—died Feb. 13, 1891, Washington, D.C.) U.S. naval officer. He served under his father, David Porter, in the West Indies and in the Mexican navy before joining the U.S. Navy in 1829. Promoted to commander in the American Civil War, he served under his foster brother, David Farragut, to help win the Battle of New Orleans. In 1863 he succeeded in running his fleet past the Confederate fort at Vicksburg to meet Ulysses S. Grant's troops and complete the effort to open the Mississippi River to Union forces. After the war he served as superintendent of the U.S. Naval Academy (1865–69) and was promoted to admiral (1870).

Learn more about Porter, David Dixon with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Originally, the boundary between Maryland and Pennsylvania. The 233-mi (375-km) line was surveyed by Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon in 1765–68 to define the disputed boundaries between the land grants of the Penns, proprietors of Pennsylvania, and the Baltimores, proprietors of Maryland. The term was first used in congressional debates leading to the Missouri Compromise (1820) to describe the dividing line between the slave states to its south and the free-soil states to its north. It is still used as the figurative dividing line between the North and South.

Learn more about Mason-Dixon Line with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born March 11, 1897, Menlo Park, Calif., U.S.—died Dec. 10, 1965, Shady, N.Y.) U.S. avant-garde composer. He began early to experiment with techniques such as tone clusters and direct manipulation of piano strings. Five tours of Europe as composer-pianist (1923–33) expanded his reputation. He coinvented the Rhythmicon, an instrument for producing several conflicting rhythms simultaneously. Immensely prolific, he wrote nearly 1,000 pieces, including 19 completed symphonies, hundreds of piano works, and many ballets. In 1927 he founded the journal New Music. His book New Musical Resources (1930) presented his compositional ideas. He was one of the most important innovators in the history of American music.

Learn more about Cowell, Henry (Dixon) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

David Dixon Porter, photograph; in the Mathew Brady collection

(born June 8, 1813, Chester, Pa., U.S.—died Feb. 13, 1891, Washington, D.C.) U.S. naval officer. He served under his father, David Porter, in the West Indies and in the Mexican navy before joining the U.S. Navy in 1829. Promoted to commander in the American Civil War, he served under his foster brother, David Farragut, to help win the Battle of New Orleans. In 1863 he succeeded in running his fleet past the Confederate fort at Vicksburg to meet Ulysses S. Grant's troops and complete the effort to open the Mississippi River to Union forces. After the war he served as superintendent of the U.S. Naval Academy (1865–69) and was promoted to admiral (1870).

Learn more about Porter, David Dixon with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born March 11, 1897, Menlo Park, Calif., U.S.—died Dec. 10, 1965, Shady, N.Y.) U.S. avant-garde composer. He began early to experiment with techniques such as tone clusters and direct manipulation of piano strings. Five tours of Europe as composer-pianist (1923–33) expanded his reputation. He coinvented the Rhythmicon, an instrument for producing several conflicting rhythms simultaneously. Immensely prolific, he wrote nearly 1,000 pieces, including 19 completed symphonies, hundreds of piano works, and many ballets. In 1927 he founded the journal New Music. His book New Musical Resources (1930) presented his compositional ideas. He was one of the most important innovators in the history of American music.

Learn more about Cowell, Henry (Dixon) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Dixon is a city in northern Solano County, California, United States, located from the state capital, Sacramento. The population was 16,103 at the 2000 census. Other nearby cities include Vacaville, Winters and Davis.

The city was originally supposed to be named Dicksonville, after local citizen Thomas Dickson whose land had been donated to create a railroad depot. The first rail shipment of merchandise from San Francisco arrived in 1872 mistakenly addressed to “Dixon,” and the new spelling has been used since mainly out of "simplicity." Dixon is also home to the May Fair, the longest running annual fair in the state of California. It is held at the Dixon Fairgrounds in May, with the four day event ending each year on Mother's Day.

Dixon is also the home of the Gymboree Corporation's only Distribution Center, servicing all stores and customers around the world.

Geography

Dixon is located at (38.449108, -121.826872).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 6.7 square miles (17.3 km²), of which, 6.6 square miles (17.1 km²) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.2 km²) of it (0.90%) is water. In the year 2007 Dixon housed the World's Largest Cornfed Farmers Maze (deemed by the Guinness Book of World Records)

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 16,103 people, 5,073 households, and 4,164 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,434.1 people per square mile (939.2/km²). There were 5,172 housing units at an average density of 781.8/sq mi (301.6/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 70.51% White, 1.93% Black or African American, 0.99% Native American, 3.11% Asian, 0.30% Pacific Islander, 17.87% from other races, and 5.29% from two or more races. 33.62% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 5,073 households out of which 47.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.0% were married couples living together, 9.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 17.9% were non-families. 13.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.17 and the average family size was 3.45.

In the city the population is concentrated among adults 25 to 44 (32.2%) and children under age 18 (32%). Only 8.5% of the population is aged 18 to 24; 20.0% from 45 to 64; and 7.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 100.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.8 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $54,472, and the median income for a family was $58,849. Males had a median income of $42,286 versus $30,378 for females. The per capita income for the city was $20,139. About 5.2% of families and 8.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.1% of those under age 18 and 6.6% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Interstate 80 passes through Dixon.

The Union Pacific Railroad mainline between Oakland and Sacramento also passes through Dixon. This line was owned by Southern Pacific Railroad until its merger with Union Pacific on September 11, 1996. The track was constructed in 1868 by the California Pacific Railroad.

Amtrak Capitol Corridor also passes through Dixon over the UP mainline but the nearest station stops are at Davis and Fairfield/Suisun. Amtrak's California Zephyr and Coast Starlight also pass through Dixon without stopping.

In 2006, the City of Dixon finished construction on a train station near downtown Dixon. However, there are currently no scheduled stops at the station.

Radio transmissions

The Voice of America ran a shortwave transmitter site that was formerly owned and operated by NBC as KNBA from 1963-1982. NBC built the site in 1944 not too long before the end of World War II in 1945. The station served as a relay to both NBC International programming overseas, and as a relay of KNBR and its programming overseas, mostly the Pacific area.

Schools

High schools

  • Dixon High (Opened 2007)
  • Maine Prairie High School (continuation school)

Middle schools

  • C.A. Jacobs Intermediate
  • Neighborhood Christian

Elementary schools

  • Silveyville (Closed 2008)
  • Anderson
  • Gretchen Higgins
  • Tremont
  • Neighborhood Christian
  • Dixon Montessori Charter School

See also

References

External links

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