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Breton

Breton

[bret-n; Fr. bruh-tawn]
Breton, André, 1896-1966, French writer, founder and theorist of the surrealist movement. He studied neuropsychology and was one of the first in France to publicize the work of Freud. At first a Dadaist, he collaborated with Philippe Soupault in automatic writing in Les Champs magnétiques (1921). He then turned to surrealism, writing three manifestos (1924, 1930, 1934) and opening a studio for "surrealist research." Breton helped to found several reviews: Littérature (1919), Minotaure (1933), and VVV (1944). His other works include Nadja (1928, tr. 1960), a semiautobiographical novel; What is Surrealism? (1934, tr. 1936); Ode à Charles Fourier (1946); and L' Art Magique (1957).

See biography by M. Polizzotti (1995); study by A. E. Balakian (1971); A. E. Balakian and R. E. Kuenzli, ed., André Breton Today (1989).

Breton, Jules Adolphe Aimé Louis, 1827-1906, French painter of rustic scenes and peasant life. His works frequently reflect a social and humanitarian concern. Breton was the author of two autobiographies.
Breton, Nicholas, 1551?-c.1623, English author, a prolific and versatile writer of verse and prose. His best work, written in a lyrical and pastoral vein, appeared in The Arbor of Amorous Devices (1597), England's Helicon (1600), and The Passionate Shepherd (1604).

See his poems (ed. with biography by J. Robertson, 1952); A Mad World My Masters and Other Prose Works (ed. by U. Kentish-Wright, 1929).

Breton, or its feminine form Bretonne, usually refers to:

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