Barrett

Barrett

[bar-it]
Barrett, Elizabeth: see Browning, Elizabeth Barrett.
Barrett, Lawrence, 1838-91, American actor, b. Paterson, N.J. An excellent romantic actor, he is best remembered for his portrayal of Cassius to the Brutus of Edwin Booth. Barrett made his New York debut (1856) in The Hunchback and appeared (1858-59) with the Boston Museum Company. He was associated with Booth from 1866 to 1889. A dignified actor, tall, with classic features, Barrett excelled in Shakespeare. He wrote a biography of Edwin Forrest (1881).
Wendell, Barrett, 1855-1921, American teacher and scholar, b. Boston, grad. Harvard, 1877. He taught at Harvard (1880-1917) and lectured at Cambridge and the Sorbonne. Among his works are a study of Cotton Mather (1891) and A Literary History of America (1900), the outgrowth of the first course in the subject at Harvard.

See M. A. De W. Howe, Barrett Wendell and His Letters (1924).

(born Nov. 3, 1909, Clydebank, Dumbartonshire, Scot.—died Dec. 6, 1995, Washington, D.C., U.S.) Scottish-born U.S. columnist and editor. His family moved to the U.S. when he was 10 years old. He was a sportswriter before joining The New York Times in 1939, where he worked as a reporter, a nationally syndicated columnist, Washington bureau chief (1953–64), executive editor (1968–69), and vice president (1969–74) before retiring in 1989. One of the most influential U.S. journalists, he had unrivaled personal access to U.S. presidents and world leaders and was often the first to break major stories. He won two Pulitzer Prizes (1945, 1957), helped create the first Op-Ed page (1970; a forum for columnists' opinion pieces), and recruited and trained many talented young journalists.

Learn more about Reston, James (Barrett) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Nov. 3, 1909, Clydebank, Dumbartonshire, Scot.—died Dec. 6, 1995, Washington, D.C., U.S.) Scottish-born U.S. columnist and editor. His family moved to the U.S. when he was 10 years old. He was a sportswriter before joining The New York Times in 1939, where he worked as a reporter, a nationally syndicated columnist, Washington bureau chief (1953–64), executive editor (1968–69), and vice president (1969–74) before retiring in 1989. One of the most influential U.S. journalists, he had unrivaled personal access to U.S. presidents and world leaders and was often the first to break major stories. He won two Pulitzer Prizes (1945, 1957), helped create the first Op-Ed page (1970; a forum for columnists' opinion pieces), and recruited and trained many talented young journalists.

Learn more about Reston, James (Barrett) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

orig. Elizabeth Barrett

Elizabeth Barrett Browning, detail of an oil painting by Michele Gordigiani, 1858; in the National elipsis

(born March 6, 1806, near Durham, Durham, Eng.—died June 29, 1861, Florence) British poet. Though she was an invalid who was afraid to meet strangers, her poetry became well known in literary circles with the publication of volumes of verse in 1838 and 1844. She met Robert Browning in 1845 and, after a courtship kept secret from her despotic father, they married and settled in Florence. Her reputation rests chiefly on the love poems written during their courtship, Sonnets from the Portuguese (1850). Her most ambitious work, the blank-verse novel Aurora Leigh (1857), was a huge popular success.

Learn more about Browning, Elizabeth Barrett with a free trial on Britannica.com.

orig. Elizabeth Barrett

Elizabeth Barrett Browning, detail of an oil painting by Michele Gordigiani, 1858; in the National elipsis

(born March 6, 1806, near Durham, Durham, Eng.—died June 29, 1861, Florence) British poet. Though she was an invalid who was afraid to meet strangers, her poetry became well known in literary circles with the publication of volumes of verse in 1838 and 1844. She met Robert Browning in 1845 and, after a courtship kept secret from her despotic father, they married and settled in Florence. Her reputation rests chiefly on the love poems written during their courtship, Sonnets from the Portuguese (1850). Her most ambitious work, the blank-verse novel Aurora Leigh (1857), was a huge popular success.

Learn more about Browning, Elizabeth Barrett with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Barrett is a city in Grant County, Minnesota, United States. The population was 355 at the 2000 census. Les Alvstad is the mayor.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.1 square miles (5.4 km²), of which, 2.1 square miles (5.3 km²) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km²) of it (1.90%) is water.

The town of Barrett wraps around the southwest side of Barrett Lake, which is formed by the Pomme de Terre River.

Major Highways

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 355 people, 142 households, and 81 families residing in the city. The population density was 172.2 people per square mile (66.5/km²). There were 163 housing units at an average density of 79.1/sq mi (30.6/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 98.87% White, 0.56% Native American, and 0.56% from two or more races.

There were 142 households out of which 20.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.0% were married couples living together, 9.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 42.3% were non-families. 38.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 21.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.05 and the average family size was 2.63.

In the city the population was spread out with 15.5% under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 19.4% from 25 to 44, 19.7% from 45 to 64, and 38.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 54 years. For every 100 females there were 82.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 71.4 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $28,750, and the median income for a family was $37,813. Males had a median income of $27,500 versus $16,250 for females. The per capita income for the city was $13,954. About 6.8% of families and 8.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.9% of those under age 18 and 12.9% of those age 65 or over.

Schools

Barrett is part of the West Central Area School District, which also includes the communities of Elbow Lake, Hoffman, Kensington, and Wendell. The West Central Area secondary school (grades 7-12) is located in Barrett, while elementary facilities are located in Elbow Lake and Kensington. Barrett was chosen as the location for the secondary facility as it is centrally located in the school district. The facility opened in the fall of 1995.

History and culture

  • Carroll's General Store is currently the only store and gas station in town. Barrett has a single restaurant and bar The Barrett Inn and The Barrett Inn II and 1/2.
  • Barrett is the home of Prairie Wind Players community theatre. Founded in 1979, PWP has produced over 80 plays, drawing in artists and patrons from miles around. The Prairie Wind Player's 1993 production of Jesus Christ Superstar made national headline's for its innovative casting (nearly all characters were portrayed by women, including Jesus).
  • Barrett is also the headquarters for Prairie Fire Children’s Theatre, which tours Minnesota and Wisconsin throughout the year bringing a professional theatrical experience to the youth of each community in just one week.
  • A common joke among those familiar with Barrett is that it is actually the center of the universe. Barrett folks like to say that everyone "Comes from, comes to, or knows someone from Barrett."

Places of interest

  • The Lakeside Pavilion is one of the few surviving lakeside facilities of its kind in Minnesota. The community of Barrett is working to restore and renovate the Pavilion. The Pavilion available for rental May 1 through September 30.
  • Roosevelt Hall was constructed by local carpenters and other workers hired under federal [Civil Works Administration]. Roosevelt Hall has been the location of Barrett's community center and public school gymnasium, 1934-53; a bowling alley, 1957-71; a youth center, 1973-74; an insulation manufacturing plant (1977-79). It is now owned and used by the Prairie Wind Players and listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

References

External links

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