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Bankhead

Bankhead

[bangk-hed]
Bankhead, John Hollis, 1872-1946, American politician, b. Moscow, Ala.; brother of William Brockman Bankhead. He was elected to the Alabama legislature in 1903 and served in the U.S. Senate from 1931 until his death. Bankhead was a leader of the farm bloc in the Senate and strongly supported the New Deal. He sponsored (with his brother) the Bankhead Cotton Control Act of 1934.
Bankhead, Tallulah, 1903-68, American actress, b. Huntsville, Ala.; daughter of William Brockman Bankhead. After her debut in 1918, Bankhead had great success on the London stage, where she appeared (1923-30) in 16 plays. She was particularly acclaimed for her performance on Broadway as Regina in The Little Foxes (1939) and, in film, as a shipwrecked journalist in Lifeboat (1944). In the latter, she brought to the role the wit, sophisticated aplomb, and uninhibited behavior that made her a legend.

See her autobiography (1952); memoir by E. Rawls (1979); biographies by B. Gill (1972), L. Israel (1972), K. Tunney (1973), and J. Lobenthal (2004).

Bankhead, William Brockman, 1874-1940, U.S. Representative from Alabama (1917-40), b. Lamar co., Ala. Chairman of the House rules committee (1934-35), Democratic floor leader (1935-36), and Speaker of the House (1936-40), he was one of the outstanding New Deal legislative leaders. The Cotton Control Act of 1934 was largely the work of Bankhead and his brother, Senator John H. Bankhead. He was also interested in monetary legislation and was considered one of the ablest parliamentarians in the House.

(born Jan. 31, 1902, Huntsville, Ala., U.S.—died Dec. 12, 1968, New York, N.Y.) U.S. film and stage actress. Born to a prestigious family (her father became a prominent congressman), she made her Broadway debut in 1918 and achieved fame on the London stage in The Dancer (1923). Her vivid presence and throaty voice contributed to her singular performances in the hit plays The Little Foxes (1939), The Skin of Our Teeth (1942), and Private Lives (1946). She made films such as A Woman's Law (1928) and Alfred Hitchcock's Lifeboat (1944) but remained primarily a stage performer. Her final stage appearance was in The Milk Train Doesn't Stop Here Anymore (1964).

Learn more about Bankhead, Tallulah (Brockman) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Jan. 31, 1902, Huntsville, Ala., U.S.—died Dec. 12, 1968, New York, N.Y.) U.S. film and stage actress. Born to a prestigious family (her father became a prominent congressman), she made her Broadway debut in 1918 and achieved fame on the London stage in The Dancer (1923). Her vivid presence and throaty voice contributed to her singular performances in the hit plays The Little Foxes (1939), The Skin of Our Teeth (1942), and Private Lives (1946). She made films such as A Woman's Law (1928) and Alfred Hitchcock's Lifeboat (1944) but remained primarily a stage performer. Her final stage appearance was in The Milk Train Doesn't Stop Here Anymore (1964).

Learn more about Bankhead, Tallulah (Brockman) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

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