Andre

Andre

[ahn-drey or, for 1, an-dree; for 2 also Fr. ahn-drey]
Andre, Carl, 1935-, American sculptor, b. Quincy, Mass. A former student of Patrick Morgan and Frank Stella, Andre produces sculptures of elemental, classic form. His works reflect the quarries, shipyards, and islands of his birthplace and his years spent as a freight-train brakeman. One of the founders of the minimalist sculpture movement, he is famous for his floor pieces, including Lever (1966), in which fire bricks were arranged to extend laterally 400 feet (122 m) from a gallery wall. In 1988, he was tried and acquitted of pushing his wife, land art sculptor Ana Mendiata, to her death from the window of their 34th-floor apartment.

(born Sept. 16, 1935, Quincy, Mass., U.S.) U.S. sculptor. The son of a draftsman for a shipbuilding firm, he attended Phillips Andover Academy and Northeastern University. He moved to New York City in 1957 and soon was producing large-scale horizontal sculptures out of steel plates, slabs of granite, styrofoam planks, bricks, and cement blocks, using a grid system based on simple mathematical principles. His work from this period was often intended to be placed directly on the gallery or museum floor; its monumental austerity was central to the Minimalist movement. Beginning in the 1970s he also experimented with large-scale wood sculpture.

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(born Sept. 16, 1935, Quincy, Mass., U.S.) U.S. sculptor. The son of a draftsman for a shipbuilding firm, he attended Phillips Andover Academy and Northeastern University. He moved to New York City in 1957 and soon was producing large-scale horizontal sculptures out of steel plates, slabs of granite, styrofoam planks, bricks, and cement blocks, using a grid system based on simple mathematical principles. His work from this period was often intended to be placed directly on the gallery or museum floor; its monumental austerity was central to the Minimalist movement. Beginning in the 1970s he also experimented with large-scale wood sculpture.

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Charles Lucien Léandre (1862 - 1934), French caricaturist and painter, was born at Champsecret (Orne), and studied painting under Blin and Cabanel.

From 1887 he figured among the exhibitors of the Salon, where he showed numerous portraits and genre pictures, but his popular fame is due to his comic drawings and caricatures. The series of the "Gotha des souverains," published in Le Rire, and Leandre's other work like that seen in L'Assiette au Beurre placed him in the front rank of modern caricaturists.

Besides his contributions to Le Rire, Le Figaro and other comic journals, he published a series of albums: Nocturnes, Le Musee des souverains, and Paris el la provénce.

Léandre produced admirable work in lithography, and designed many memorable posters, such as the "Yvette Guilbert." "Les nouveaux maries," "Joseph Prudhomme," "Les Lutteurs," and "La Femme au chien."

Charles Léandre won a bronze medal at the Exposition Universelle in 1889 for a large size painting : la Mère ou « Dormio cor meum vigilat » ("Je dors mais mon coeur veille").

In 1900, at the next Exposition Universelle, he was among the five lithographic artists selected to achieve two compositions on a selected theme; he received a gold medal at this contest.

He was created a knight of the Legion of Honour.

In 1904, he created the Société des Peintres Humoristes.

In 1921, he got the Medal of Honour of the Société des artistes français, in the engraving section, one of the more important honorary awards an artist could obtain in Paris.

In 1925, Charles Léandre was promoted an Officer of the Legion of Honour.

He died in 1934 in his Caulaincourt street studio, in Montmartre.

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