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Amy

Amy

[ey-mee]
Lothrop, Amy: see under Warner, Susan Bogert.
Tan, Amy, 1952-, American novelist, b. Oakland, Calif. The daughter of Chinese immigrants, she has taken for her theme the lives of Asian-Americans and the generational and cultural differences among them, concentrating on women's experiences. Tan's novels include The Joy Luck Club (1989), The Kitchen God's Wife (1991), The Hundred Secret Senses (1995), The Bonesetter's Daughter (2001), and Saving Fish from Drowning (2005). She has also written a children's book, The Moon Lady (1992), and essays, e.g., the autobiographical pieces collected in The Opposite of Fate (2003).
Clampitt, Amy, 1920-94, American poet, b. New Providence, Iowa. A librarian and editor, she wrote little until the 1960s. Her first major magazine publication was in 1974, and her first commercially published volume of poems, The Kingfisher (1983), appeared when she was 63. Later volumes are What the Light Was Like (1985), Archaic Figure (1987), Westward (1990), and A Silence Opens (1994). Clampitt's collected poems appeared in 1997. Her densely ornate and richly allusive verse is often elegiac in tone, and much of her best work concerns the natural world. She also published an essay collection, Predecessors, et Cetera (1990).

See her selected letters, ed. by W. Spiegelman (2005).

Lowell, Amy, 1874-1925, American poet, biographer, and critic, b. Brookline, Mass., privately educated; sister of Percival Lowell and Abbott Lawrence Lowell. In 1912 she published A Dome of Many-Colored Glass, a volume of conventional verse. The next year she went to England, where she met Ezra Pound and became identified with the imagists. After Pound abandoned the group, she became its leader and champion, publishing a three-volume anthology entitled Some Imagist Poets (1915, 1916, 1917). Lowell's own poetry is particularly notable for its rendering of sensuous images. Her experiments with polyphonic prose, a free-verse form that combines prose and poetry, are considered unsuccessful. Among her volumes of poetry are Sword Blades and Poppy Seed (1914), Men, Women, and Ghosts (1916), Can Grande's Castle (1918), What's o'Clock (1925; Pulitzer Prize), East Wind (1926), and Ballads for Sale (1927). Her best-known poems are "Patterns" and "Lilacs." Lowell's perceptive and dynamic criticism includes Six French Poets (1915) and Tendencies in Modern American Poetry (1917). Her most ambitious work is her two-volume biography of Keats (1925).

See biographies by H. Gregory (1958) and S. F. Damon (1935, repr. 1966).

Robsart, Amy, 1532-60, maiden name of the wife of Robert Dudley, later earl of Leicester, a favorite of Queen Elizabeth I of England. When Lady Dudley was found dead at the foot of a staircase in Cumnor Hall, Berkshire, rumor had it that her husband had arranged her murder so that he might be free to wed the queen. An investigating jury returned a verdict of accidental death, but posterity has kept open the question of Leicester's involvement. A version of the story appears in Scott's novel Kenilworth.
Amy is a given name, a variant of "Aimee", which means beloved in French, from Old French amede, from Latin amāta, feminine singular past participle of amāre "to love". The name may also originate from French Ami, which means friend.

Amy can also be a diminutive of "Amelia". Amelia is derived from a separate root word, the Germanic amal, "to work."

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