Definitions

Aiken

Aiken

[ey-kuhn]
Aiken, Conrad, 1889-1973, American author, b. Savannah, Ga., grad. Harvard, 1912. Aiken is best known for his poetry, which often is preoccupied with the sound and structure of music; his volumes of verse include The Charnel Rose (1918), Selected Poems (1929; Pulitzer Prize), Brownstone Eclogues (1942), Collected Poems (1953), A Letter from Li Po (1956), A Seizure of Limericks (1964), and The Clerk's Journal (1971). In 1924 he edited Emily Dickinson's Selected Poems, which established her literary reputation. Aiken's interest in psychopathology is evident in the novels Blue Voyage (1927) and Great Circle (1933). His collected critical essays, A Reviewer's ABC, appeared in 1958, his collected short stories—including "Mr. Arcularis" and "Silent Snow, Secret Snow"—in 1961. Aiken held (1950-57) the poetry chair at the Library of Congress and was awarded the National Medal for Literature (1969).

See his autobiography, Ushant (1952, repr. 1971); biography by J. Martin (1962).

Aiken, city (1990 pop. 19,872), seat of Aiken co., W S.C.; inc. 1835. A resort and polo center and a training area for Thoroughbreds, Aiken has apparel, printing and publishing, drug, and chemical industries. Agricultural products include poultry, livestock, grain, peanuts, cotton, and peaches. Kaolin mines are nearby. A branch of the Univ. of South Carolina is in the city. Nearby is the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant, which long manufactured nuclear weapons and is now the site of a controversial plant processing nuclear wastes.

(born Aug. 5, 1889, Savannah, Ga., U.S.—died Aug. 17, 1973, Savannah) U.S. writer. Aiken was traumatized as a child when his father killed Aiken's mother and then himself. Educated at Harvard University, Aiken wrote most of his fiction in the 1920s and '30s. His works are influenced by early psychoanalytic theory. Generally more successful than his novels were his short stories, notably “Strange Moonlight” from Bring! Bring! (1925) and “Silent Snow, Secret Snow” and “Mr. Arcularis” from Among the Lost People (1934). His best poetry, including “Preludes to Definition,” is in his Collected Poems (1953).

Learn more about Aiken, Conrad (Potter) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Aug. 5, 1889, Savannah, Ga., U.S.—died Aug. 17, 1973, Savannah) U.S. writer. Aiken was traumatized as a child when his father killed Aiken's mother and then himself. Educated at Harvard University, Aiken wrote most of his fiction in the 1920s and '30s. His works are influenced by early psychoanalytic theory. Generally more successful than his novels were his short stories, notably “Strange Moonlight” from Bring! Bring! (1925) and “Silent Snow, Secret Snow” and “Mr. Arcularis” from Among the Lost People (1934). His best poetry, including “Preludes to Definition,” is in his Collected Poems (1953).

Learn more about Aiken, Conrad (Potter) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Aiken, South Carolina is a city in the United States state of South Carolina. It is the county seat of Aiken County, and with Augusta, Georgia is one of the two largest cities of the Central Savannah River Area. Aiken is home to the University of South Carolina at Aiken. The population was 25,337 at the 2000 census. Aiken was recognized with the All-America City Award in 1997 by the National Civic League.

Geography

Aiken is located at (33.549397, -81.720689).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 16.2 square miles (41.9 km²), of which, 16.2 square miles (41.9 km²) of it is land and 0.06% is water.

Demographics

Population in 1890, 2,362; in 1900, 3,414; in 1910, 3,911; in 1940, 6,168. As of the census of 2000, there were 25,337 people, 10,287 households, and 6,758 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,566.3 people per square mile (604.6/km²). There were 11,373 housing units at an average density of 703.1/sq mi (271.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 66.63% White, 30.30% African American, 0.25% Native American, 1.28% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.44% from other races, and 1.09% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.49% of the population.

There were 10,287 households out of which 28.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.9% were married couples living together, 13.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.3% were non-families. 29.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 2.90.

In the city the population was spread out with 23.2% under the age of 18, 9.4% from 18 to 24, 25.5% from 25 to 44, 24.0% from 45 to 64, and 17.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 87.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $49,100, and the median income for a family was $63,520. Males had a median income of $51,988 versus $28,009 for females. The per capita income for the city was $24,129. About 10.1% of families and 14.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.0% of those under age 18 and 10.5% of those age 65 or over.

Historical events in Aiken

The history of Aiken dates to its incorporation on December 19, 1835. It was named for William Aiken, a banker in Charleston.

In the late 1800s, Aiken gained fame as a wintering spot for wealthy folk from the Northeast. Over the years Aiken has hosted many famous and notable people.

In the spring of 1931, the nation's attention was riveted on Aiken when Nicholas Longworth, Republican Speaker of the House, came down unexpectedly with pneumonia and died there on April 9, 1931. He had been visiting family friends – all long-time Republicans and fellow poker players – who had a winter home in town. Longworth was married to US President Theodore Roosevelt's daughter, Alice Roosevelt Longworth, who rushed to his side from Cincinnati, Ohio, arriving prior to his death.

1950 - Announcement of Savannah River Plant

The selection of a site near Aiken by the US Atomic Energy Commission to build a plant to produce fuel for thermonuclear weapons was announced on November 30, 1950. The site was named the Savannah River Plant (subsequently renamed Savannah River Site (SRS))in 1989). The facility contained 5 production reactors, fuel fabrication facilities, a research laboratory, heavy water production facilities, two fuel reprocessing facilities and tritium recovery facilities.

Historic places

Education

Colleges and Universities

  • University of South Carolina at Aiken.
  • Aiken Technical College
  • The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL)is a research unit of The University of Georgia, located at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, S.C. - Since the laboratory's founding in 1951 by Dr. Eugene Odum of the University of Georgia, a pioneer of modern ecology, SREL scientists have studied the long-term ecological impacts of the SRS nuclear facility. SREL is supported by federal, state, industry, and foundation funding.

Steeplechase racing

The Aiken Steeplechase Association, founded in 1930, hosts the Imperial Cup each March and the Holiday Cup in October, both of which are steeplechase races sanctioned by the National Steeplechase Association.

The Aiken Thoroughbred Racing Hall of Fame and Museum was established in 1977 as a tribute to the famous flat racing and steeplechase Thoroughbred horses that trained at the The Aiken Training Track

Notable residents

In the late 1800s and the first part of the 1900s, Aiken served as a winter playground for many of the country's wealthiest families such the Vanderbilts, Bostwicks, and the Whitneys.

References

See also

External links

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