aberration

aberration

[ab-uh-rey-shuhn]
aberration, in optics, condition that causes a blurring and loss of clearness in the images produced by lenses or mirrors. Of the many types of aberration, the two most significant to the lens maker are spherical and chromatic. Spherical aberration is caused by the failure of a lens or mirror of spherical section to bring parallel rays of light to a single focus. The effect results from the operation of the laws of optics, not from defects in construction. Spherical aberration can be prevented by using a parabolic rather than a spherical section, but this involves much greater complexity and expense in lens or mirror construction. Chromatic aberration results in the blurred coloring of the edge of an image when white light is sent through a lens. This is caused by the fact that some colors of light are bent, or refracted, more than others after passing through a lens. For example, violet light is bent more than red and thus is brought to a focus nearer the lens than red. No single lens can ever be free of chromatic aberration, but by combining lenses of different types, the effects of the component lenses can be made to cancel one another. Such an arrangement is called an achromatic lens. See reflection; refraction.

Apparent displacement of a star or other celestial body resulting from Earth's orbital motion around the Sun. The maximum displacement is about 20.49 seconds of arc. It depends on the ratio of Earth's orbital speed to the speed of light and Earth's direction of motion and thus provides confirmation that Earth orbits the Sun rather than the reverse.

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Deviation of light rays by lenses or curved mirrors which causes the images to be blurred. Spherical aberration occurs because curvature in a lens or mirror causes rays falling on the outer edges to be brought to a focus at a different point than those falling on the middle. This makes the images formed appear blurred. Chromatic aberration, which occurs in lenses but not mirrors, is the failure of a lens to focus all colours (wavelengths) of light in the same plane; the image appears blurred and shows rainbow-coloured fringes around the edges. Seealso astigmatism.

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Aberration has several meanings:

In optics:

In relativity:

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