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Julia Ward Howe

[hou]
orig. Julia Ward

Julia Ward Howe, 1902.

(born May 27, 1819, New York, N.Y., U.S.—died Oct. 17, 1910, Newport, R.I.) U.S. abolitionist and social reformer. Born to a well-to-do family, she was educated privately. In 1843 she married educator Samuel Gridley Howe and took up residence in Boston. For a while she and her husband published the Commonwealth, an abolitionist newspaper. During a visit to an army camp near Washington, D.C., in 1861, she wrote a poem, “Battle Hymn of the Republic,” to be set to an old folk tune also used for “John Brown's Body.” Published in February 1862 in The Atlantic Monthly, it became the semiofficial Civil War song of the Union Army, and Howe became famous. After the war she involved herself in the woman suffrage movement, helping to found and serving as president of the New England Woman Suffrage Association (1868–77, 1893–1910). She also wrote travel books, biography, drama, verse, and children's songs and edited Woman's Journal (1870–90). In 1908 she became the first woman elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

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orig. Julia Ward

Julia Ward Howe, 1902.

(born May 27, 1819, New York, N.Y., U.S.—died Oct. 17, 1910, Newport, R.I.) U.S. abolitionist and social reformer. Born to a well-to-do family, she was educated privately. In 1843 she married educator Samuel Gridley Howe and took up residence in Boston. For a while she and her husband published the Commonwealth, an abolitionist newspaper. During a visit to an army camp near Washington, D.C., in 1861, she wrote a poem, “Battle Hymn of the Republic,” to be set to an old folk tune also used for “John Brown's Body.” Published in February 1862 in The Atlantic Monthly, it became the semiofficial Civil War song of the Union Army, and Howe became famous. After the war she involved herself in the woman suffrage movement, helping to found and serving as president of the New England Woman Suffrage Association (1868–77, 1893–1910). She also wrote travel books, biography, drama, verse, and children's songs and edited Woman's Journal (1870–90). In 1908 she became the first woman elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

Learn more about Howe, Julia Ward with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Henry Beecher, photographed by Napoleon Sarony

(born June 24, 1813, Litchfield, Conn., U.S.—died March 8, 1887, Brooklyn, N.Y.) U.S. Congregational clergyman. The son of a minister, he was the brother of Harriet Beecher Stowe and Catharine Esther Beecher. After graduating from Amherst College and later studying at Lane Theological Seminary, he served as pastor to congregations in Indiana. In 1847 he was called to Plymouth Church in Brooklyn. A famous orator and one of the most influential preachers of his time, he opposed slavery and supported women's suffrage, Charles Darwin's theory of evolution, and scientific biblical criticism. He gained unfavourable publicity in 1874 when he was put on trial for adultery, but he was acquitted and returned to his church.

Learn more about Beecher, Henry Ward with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Henry Beecher, photographed by Napoleon Sarony

(born June 24, 1813, Litchfield, Conn., U.S.—died March 8, 1887, Brooklyn, N.Y.) U.S. Congregational clergyman. The son of a minister, he was the brother of Harriet Beecher Stowe and Catharine Esther Beecher. After graduating from Amherst College and later studying at Lane Theological Seminary, he served as pastor to congregations in Indiana. In 1847 he was called to Plymouth Church in Brooklyn. A famous orator and one of the most influential preachers of his time, he opposed slavery and supported women's suffrage, Charles Darwin's theory of evolution, and scientific biblical criticism. He gained unfavourable publicity in 1874 when he was put on trial for adultery, but he was acquitted and returned to his church.

Learn more about Beecher, Henry Ward with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Ward is the fourth most populous city in Lonoke County, Arkansas, United States. The population was 2,580 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Little RockNorth Little RockConway Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Geography

Ward is located at (35.019996, -91.954987).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.9 square miles (10.1 km²), all of it land.

The city is divided into three wards, progressing from the northeast to the southwest. In the city's first ward is its downtown, which is situated diagonally along a railroad line running parallel to Arkansas Highway 367 (the former path of U.S. Highway 67). The second ward contains the central portion of the city, its industrial area, and its access to the current U.S. Highway 67/167. Arkansas Highway 319 (Peyton Street within the city south of Highway 367) is a primary thoroughfare in central Ward toward the southwestern section of the city. Some of the most recent development is in the city's third ward, situated mostly along Peyton Street, south of Wilson Street into the Old Austin community and Arkansas Highway 38; a small detached portion of the ward is located to the northwest along the railroad line and Arkansas Highway 367. Ward Central Elementary, the city's campus of the Cabot School District, is located in the larger portion of the third ward.

Government

Ward is governed by a mayor-council form of municipal government, with a mayor, city clerk, and six-member city council, as well as four city departments — fire, police, street maintenance, and utilities (water and sanitation). City administration is housed in the former Ward Elementary School; the campus is also the site of the city's library, a branch of the Lonoke-Prairie Regional Library System.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 2,580 people, 938 households, and 726 families residing in the city. The population density was 662.4 people per square mile (256.1/km²). There were 1,075 housing units at an average density of 276.0/sq mi (106.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 97.33% White, 0.19% Black or African American, 0.78% Native American, 0.39% Asian, 0.16% from other races, and 1.16% from two or more races. 1.94% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 938 households out of which 46.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.3% were married couples living together, 12.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.6% were non-families. 18.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.75 and the average family size was 3.13.

In the city the population was spread out with 32.9% under the age of 18, 9.1% from 18 to 24, 33.3% from 25 to 44, 16.9% from 45 to 64, and 7.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 29 years. For every 100 females there were 95.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.4 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $32,924, and the median income for a family was $34,702. Males had a median income of $30,275 versus $21,151 for females. The per capita income for the city was $13,581. About 13.6% of families and 16.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.8% of those under age 18 and 18.0% of those age 65 or over.

References

External links

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