Definitions

-corn

sorghum

[sawr-guhm]

Cereal grain plant of the family Poaceae (or Gramineae), probably native to Africa, and its edible starchy seeds. All types raised chiefly for grain belong to the species Sorghum vulgare, which includes varieties of grain sorghums and grass sorghums (grown for hay and fodder), and broomcorn (used in making brooms and brushes). The strong grass usually grows 2–8 ft (0.5–2.5 m) or higher. The seeds are smaller than those of wheat. Though high in carbohydrates, sorghum is of lower feed quality than corn. Resistant to drought and heat, sorghum is one of Africa's major cereal grains. It is also grown in the U.S., India, Pakistan, and northern and northeastern China. Substantial quantities are also grown in Iran, the Arabian Peninsula, Argentina, Australia, and southern Europe. The grain is usually ground into meal for porridge, flatbreads, and cakes.

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Sweet syrup produced by breaking down (hydrolyzing) cornstarch (a product of corn). Corn syrup contains dextrins, maltose, and dextrose and is used in baked goods, jelly and jam, and candy. High-fructose corn syrup is widely used in the manufacture of soft drinks and other foods because it is considerably cheaper than sucrose.

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or cotton bollworm or tomato fruitworm

Moth larva (Heliothis zea, family Noctuidae) that damages corn, tomato, cotton, and other seasonal crops. The smooth, fleshy, green or brown caterpillars feed on corn kernels near the tip of the ear and burrow into tomatoes and cotton bolls. Four or five generations of the pale brown adult moths, with wingspans of 1.3 in. (3.5 cm), are produced annually.

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or maize

Cereal plant (Zea mays) of the family Poaceae (or Gramineae). It originated in the New World and has been introduced globally. American Indians taught colonists to grow corn, including some varieties of yellow corn that are still popular as food, as well as varieties with red, blue, pink, and black kernels, often banded, spotted, or striped, that today are regarded as ornamental and in the U.S. are called Indian corn. The tall, annual grass has a stout, erect, solid stem and large narrow leaves with wavy margins. Corn is used as livestock feed, as human food, and as raw material in industry. Though it is a major food in many parts of the world, it is inferior to other cereals in nutritional value. Inedible parts of the plant are used in industry—stalks for paper and wallboard; husks for filling material; cobs for fuel, to make charcoal, and in the preparation of industrial solvents. Corn husks also have a long history of use in the folk arts for objects such as woven amulets and corn-husk dolls. Corn is one of the most widely distributed of the world's food plants. In the U.S. corn is the most important crop, but slightly more acres of soybeans are planted.

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Traditional area, midwestern U.S. Roughly covering western Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, southern Minnesota, eastern South Dakota, Missouri, eastern Nebraska, and eastern Kansas, it is a region in which corn and soybeans are the dominant crops. Many farms are family-operated and average more than 300 acres (120 hectares). Despite the name, the region is agriculturally diverse, raising various feed-grains and livestock.

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Corn is a town in Washita County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 591 at the 2000 census.

Geography

Corn is located at (35.378269, -98.783200).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.4 square miles (0.9 km²), all of it land.

History

Originally the name of the town of Corn was spelled Korn. This was changed during World War II due to anti-German sentiment. There are several stories as to how the town received the name Corn. However, the most commonly believed story is that the town received its name because its first post office was in a corn field.

The town was originally settled by German/Russian Mennonites. In the late 1800s, around the time of the Cheyenne-Arapaho Land Run, a Mennonite Brethren missionary stationed nearby invited fellow Mennonites from Kansas to homestead in the area. They brought along "Turkey Red" wheat, which grew well in the western Oklahoma soil. On its one-hundredth birthday the town received a historical marker celebrating this accomplishment.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 591 people, 198 households, and 136 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,630.2 people per square mile (633.9/km²). There were 226 housing units at an average density of 623.4/sq mi (242.4/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 91.71% White, 0.34% African American, 1.86% Native American, 2.88% from other races, and 3.21% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.57% of the population.

There were 198 households out of which 32.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.1% were married couples living together, 6.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.3% were non-families. 30.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 19.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.17.

In the town the population was spread out with 24.9% under the age of 18, 4.6% from 18 to 24, 21.8% from 25 to 44, 15.2% from 45 to 64, and 33.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females there were 78.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 72.1 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $31,154, and the median income for a family was $33,281. Males had a median income of $23,750 versus $18,750 for females. The per capita income for the town was $15,632. About 14.4% of families and 14.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.1% of those under age 18 and 2.4% of those age 65 or over.

References

External links

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